Update on medications – management of asthma in adults and children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558982
Title:
Update on medications – management of asthma in adults and children
Authors:
Morrow, Ruth
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in General Practice
Issue Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558982
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
recent study of 8,000 patients in 11 European countries showed that the levels of asthma control was low with 45% of respondents having uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common, with 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More worryingly, more than 80% of respondents who had an acute exacerbation considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious (Price et al, 2014). This article focuses on drugs which the practice nurse may encounter on a daily basis through caring for adults and children with asthma. It will address the newer drugs on the market which require the practice nurse to provide ongoing support, education and monitoring for the patient. Keeping in mind, the one airway concept, the article will focus drugs used to treat upper airway conditions such as chronic and seasonal allergic rhinitis.
Keywords:
ASTHMA; RESPIRATORY DISORDERS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Ruthen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T09:04:31Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T09:04:31Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/558982en
dc.descriptionrecent study of 8,000 patients in 11 European countries showed that the levels of asthma control was low with 45% of respondents having uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common, with 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More worryingly, more than 80% of respondents who had an acute exacerbation considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious (Price et al, 2014). This article focuses on drugs which the practice nurse may encounter on a daily basis through caring for adults and children with asthma. It will address the newer drugs on the market which require the practice nurse to provide ongoing support, education and monitoring for the patient. Keeping in mind, the one airway concept, the article will focus drugs used to treat upper airway conditions such as chronic and seasonal allergic rhinitis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen
dc.subjectASTHMAen
dc.subjectRESPIRATORY DISORDERSen
dc.titleUpdate on medications – management of asthma in adults and childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in General Practiceen
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