Developing the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558841
Title:
Developing the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design.
Authors:
Surgenor, Paul Wg; Freeman, Joan; O'Connor, Cindy
Affiliation:
Pieta House, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Citation:
Developing the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design. 2015, 3 (1):14 BMC Psychol
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
BMC psychology
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558841
DOI:
10.1186/s40359-015-0071-6
PubMed ID:
25954508
Abstract:
While most crisis intervention models adhere to a generalised theoretical framework, the lack of clarity around how these should be enacted has resulted in a proliferation of models, most of which have little to no empirical support. The primary aim of this research was to propose a suicide intervention model that would resolve the client's suicidal crisis by decreasing their suicidal ideation and improve their outlook through enhancing a range of protective factors. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of this model on negative and positive outlook.; A quasi-experimental, pre-test post-test repeated measures design was employed. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, depression, and positive and negative suicidal ideation was administered to the same participants pre- and post- therapy facilitating paired responses.; Multiple analysis of variance and paired-samples t-tests were conducted to establish whether therapy using the PH-SIM had a significant effect on the clients' negative and positive outlook. Analyses revealed a statistically significant effect of therapy for depression, negative suicidal ideation, self-esteem, and positive suicidal ideation. Negative outlook was significantly lower after therapy and positive outlook significantly higher.; The decreased negative outlook and increased positive outlook following therapy provide some support for the proposed model in fulfilling its role, though additional research is required to establish the precise role of the intervention model in achieving this.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Background While most crisis intervention models adhere to a generalised theoretical framework, the lack of clarity around how these should be enacted has resulted in a proliferation of models, most of which have little to no empirical support. The primary aim of this research was to propose a suicide intervention model that would resolve the client’s suicidal crisis by decreasing their suicidal ideation and improve their outlook through enhancing a range of protective factors. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of this model on negative and positive outlook. Methods A quasi-experimental, pre-test post-test repeated measures design was employed. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, depression, and positive and negative suicidal ideation was administered to the same participants pre- and post- therapy facilitating paired responses. Results Multiple analysis of variance and paired-samples t-tests were conducted to establish whether therapy using the PH-SIM had a significant effect on the clients’ negative and positive outlook. Analyses revealed a statistically significant effect of therapy for depression, negative suicidal ideation, self-esteem, and positive suicidal ideation. Negative outlook was significantly lower after therapy and positive outlook significantly higher. Conclusions The decreased negative outlook and increased positive outlook following therapy provide some support for the proposed model in fulfilling its role, though additional research is required to establish the precise role of the intervention model in achieving this.
Keywords:
SUICIDE; MENTAL HEALTH
Local subject classification:
CRISIS INTERVENTION
ISSN:
2050-7283

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSurgenor, Paul Wgen
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Joanen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Cindyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-03T14:59:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-03T14:59:41Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationDeveloping the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design. 2015, 3 (1):14 BMC Psycholen
dc.identifier.issn2050-7283en
dc.identifier.pmid25954508en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40359-015-0071-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/558841en
dc.descriptionBackground While most crisis intervention models adhere to a generalised theoretical framework, the lack of clarity around how these should be enacted has resulted in a proliferation of models, most of which have little to no empirical support. The primary aim of this research was to propose a suicide intervention model that would resolve the client’s suicidal crisis by decreasing their suicidal ideation and improve their outlook through enhancing a range of protective factors. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of this model on negative and positive outlook. Methods A quasi-experimental, pre-test post-test repeated measures design was employed. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, depression, and positive and negative suicidal ideation was administered to the same participants pre- and post- therapy facilitating paired responses. Results Multiple analysis of variance and paired-samples t-tests were conducted to establish whether therapy using the PH-SIM had a significant effect on the clients’ negative and positive outlook. Analyses revealed a statistically significant effect of therapy for depression, negative suicidal ideation, self-esteem, and positive suicidal ideation. Negative outlook was significantly lower after therapy and positive outlook significantly higher. Conclusions The decreased negative outlook and increased positive outlook following therapy provide some support for the proposed model in fulfilling its role, though additional research is required to establish the precise role of the intervention model in achieving this.en
dc.description.abstractWhile most crisis intervention models adhere to a generalised theoretical framework, the lack of clarity around how these should be enacted has resulted in a proliferation of models, most of which have little to no empirical support. The primary aim of this research was to propose a suicide intervention model that would resolve the client's suicidal crisis by decreasing their suicidal ideation and improve their outlook through enhancing a range of protective factors. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of this model on negative and positive outlook.en
dc.description.abstractA quasi-experimental, pre-test post-test repeated measures design was employed. A questionnaire assessing self-esteem, depression, and positive and negative suicidal ideation was administered to the same participants pre- and post- therapy facilitating paired responses.en
dc.description.abstractMultiple analysis of variance and paired-samples t-tests were conducted to establish whether therapy using the PH-SIM had a significant effect on the clients' negative and positive outlook. Analyses revealed a statistically significant effect of therapy for depression, negative suicidal ideation, self-esteem, and positive suicidal ideation. Negative outlook was significantly lower after therapy and positive outlook significantly higher.en
dc.description.abstractThe decreased negative outlook and increased positive outlook following therapy provide some support for the proposed model in fulfilling its role, though additional research is required to establish the precise role of the intervention model in achieving this.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC psychologyen
dc.subjectSUICIDEen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subject.otherCRISIS INTERVENTIONen
dc.titleDeveloping the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPieta House, Co. Dublin, Irelanden
dc.identifier.journalBMC psychologyen

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