Women's healthcare service in General Practice: a national survey of current service provisions and attitudes of Irish General Practitioners.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558794
Title:
Women's healthcare service in General Practice: a national survey of current service provisions and attitudes of Irish General Practitioners.
Authors:
Ni Riain, Ailis; Canning, Philomena
Affiliation:
University College Dublin. Department of General Practice.
Citation:
Ni Riain, Ailis, Canning, Philomena. 2000. Women's healthcare service in General Practice: a national survey of current service provisions and attitudes of Irish General Practitioners. Dublin: Irish College of General Practitioners.
Publisher:
Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP)
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558794
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
Women's healthcare is a priority for government, for medical professionals and, of course, for women themselves. General practitioners will playa central role in the provision of an expanded service. While there is some data on the attitudes and preferences of women in this area, little information is available on the services provided by GPs, the barriers to a wider service or their attitudes. Such information is required to inform the development of women's health services. This study, combining focus group discussions with a random, national survey was designed to provide this baseline data. A stratified random sample of 30% of Irish GPs (778) was surveyed and a further 13 participated in focus group discussions. Confidentiality was assured and a variety of views were expressed. The satisfactory response rate in summertime indicates a high level of interest in this area. There is generally a high level of provision of family planning and women's health services throughout the country. A large majority of GPs believe that family planning is an integral aspect of general practice and that a comprehensive service is feasible. Female GPs, doctors under the age of 40, those with a Family Planning Certificate, rural GPs and those with a practice nurse are more likely to provide a broader range of services.
Keywords:
GENERAL PRACTICE; FAMILY PLANNING; WOMEN'S HEALTH; STATISTICAL DATA
Sponsors:
General Medical Services Scheme. Education and Research Fund and the Irish College of General Practitioners Education and Research Foundation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNi Riain, Ailisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCanning, Philomenaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-02T11:03:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-02T11:03:51Zen
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.citationNi Riain, Ailis, Canning, Philomena. 2000. Women's healthcare service in General Practice: a national survey of current service provisions and attitudes of Irish General Practitioners. Dublin: Irish College of General Practitioners.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/558794en
dc.descriptionWomen's healthcare is a priority for government, for medical professionals and, of course, for women themselves. General practitioners will playa central role in the provision of an expanded service. While there is some data on the attitudes and preferences of women in this area, little information is available on the services provided by GPs, the barriers to a wider service or their attitudes. Such information is required to inform the development of women's health services. This study, combining focus group discussions with a random, national survey was designed to provide this baseline data. A stratified random sample of 30% of Irish GPs (778) was surveyed and a further 13 participated in focus group discussions. Confidentiality was assured and a variety of views were expressed. The satisfactory response rate in summertime indicates a high level of interest in this area. There is generally a high level of provision of family planning and women's health services throughout the country. A large majority of GPs believe that family planning is an integral aspect of general practice and that a comprehensive service is feasible. Female GPs, doctors under the age of 40, those with a Family Planning Certificate, rural GPs and those with a practice nurse are more likely to provide a broader range of services.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipGeneral Medical Services Scheme. Education and Research Fund and the Irish College of General Practitioners Education and Research Foundation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish College of General Practitioners (ICGP)en_GB
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTICEen_GB
dc.subjectFAMILY PLANNINGen_GB
dc.subjectWOMEN'S HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectSTATISTICAL DATAen_GB
dc.titleWomen's healthcare service in General Practice: a national survey of current service provisions and attitudes of Irish General Practitioners.en_GB
dc.typeStudyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Dublin. Department of General Practice.en_GB
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