Access to diagnostics in primary care and the impact on a primary care led health service.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558773
Title:
Access to diagnostics in primary care and the impact on a primary care led health service.
Authors:
O'Riordan, M; Doran, G; Collins, C
Citation:
Access to diagnostics in primary care and the impact on a primary care led health service. 2015, 108 (2):53-5 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/558773
PubMed ID:
25803958
Abstract:
We undertook a postal survey of GPs to establish their current access to radiological and endoscopic tests. More than one fifth of GPs do not have direct access to abdominal (n = 42, 21.4%) or pelvic (n = 49, 24.6%) ultrasound in the public system. Where access is available public patients have an average 14 week waiting period. In stark contrast in the private system virtually all GPs have direct access (n = 159, 99.2% and n = 156, 98.8% respectively for abdominal and pelvic ultrasound) with an average wait of just over four days. Direct access to CT scan in the public system is available to the minority of GPs, e.g. n = 31, 18.4% for chest scan, in the public system; even where available, there is an average 12 week wait for this. In comparison 151 (88.6%) GPs have access to CT chest scanning in the private sector with an average waiting time of 5.4 working days. Such limited access to diagnostics impacts on the delivery of a quality service.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
We undertook a postal survey of GPs to establish their current access to radiological and endoscopic tests. More than one fifth of GPs do not have direct access to abdominal (n=42, 21.4%) or pelvic (n=49, 24.6%) ultrasound in the public system. Where access is available public patients have an average 14 week waiting period. In stark contrast in the private system virtually all GPs have direct access (n=159, 99.2% and n=156, 98.8% respectively for abdominal and pelvic ultrasound) with an average wait of just over four days. Direct access to CT scan in the public system is available to the minority of GPs, e.g. n=31, 18.4% for chest scan, in the public system; even where available, there is an average 12 week wait for this. In comparison 151 (88.6%) GPs have access to CT chest scanning in the private sector with an average waiting time of 5.4 working days. Such limited access to diagnostics impacts on the delivery of a quality service.
MeSH:
Databases, Factual; Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Humans; Male; Medical Records Systems, Computerized; Physicians, Primary Care; Primary Health Care; Private Practice
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Riordan, Men
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Gen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Cen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-02T11:01:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-02T11:01:23Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02en
dc.identifier.citationAccess to diagnostics in primary care and the impact on a primary care led health service. 2015, 108 (2):53-5 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102en
dc.identifier.pmid25803958en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/558773en
dc.descriptionWe undertook a postal survey of GPs to establish their current access to radiological and endoscopic tests. More than one fifth of GPs do not have direct access to abdominal (n=42, 21.4%) or pelvic (n=49, 24.6%) ultrasound in the public system. Where access is available public patients have an average 14 week waiting period. In stark contrast in the private system virtually all GPs have direct access (n=159, 99.2% and n=156, 98.8% respectively for abdominal and pelvic ultrasound) with an average wait of just over four days. Direct access to CT scan in the public system is available to the minority of GPs, e.g. n=31, 18.4% for chest scan, in the public system; even where available, there is an average 12 week wait for this. In comparison 151 (88.6%) GPs have access to CT chest scanning in the private sector with an average waiting time of 5.4 working days. Such limited access to diagnostics impacts on the delivery of a quality service.en
dc.description.abstractWe undertook a postal survey of GPs to establish their current access to radiological and endoscopic tests. More than one fifth of GPs do not have direct access to abdominal (n = 42, 21.4%) or pelvic (n = 49, 24.6%) ultrasound in the public system. Where access is available public patients have an average 14 week waiting period. In stark contrast in the private system virtually all GPs have direct access (n = 159, 99.2% and n = 156, 98.8% respectively for abdominal and pelvic ultrasound) with an average wait of just over four days. Direct access to CT scan in the public system is available to the minority of GPs, e.g. n = 31, 18.4% for chest scan, in the public system; even where available, there is an average 12 week wait for this. In comparison 151 (88.6%) GPs have access to CT chest scanning in the private sector with an average waiting time of 5.4 working days. Such limited access to diagnostics impacts on the delivery of a quality service.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factualen
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imagingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMedical Records Systems, Computerizeden
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Primary Careen
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.meshPrivate Practiceen
dc.titleAccess to diagnostics in primary care and the impact on a primary care led health service.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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