Growing Up in Ireland national longitudinal study of children: development from birth to three years infant cohort.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/555696
Title:
Growing Up in Ireland national longitudinal study of children: development from birth to three years infant cohort.
Other Titles:
Report 5. Executive Summary included as a separate document.
Authors:
Williams, James; Murray, Aisling; McCrory, Cathal; McNally, Sinead
Is Part Of:
Growing Up In Ireland National Longitudinal Study of Children
Affiliation:
ESRI; TCD
Citation:
Williams, James et al [2013]. Growing Up in Ireland national longitudinal study of children: development from birth to three years infant cohort. Report 5. Dublin: Department of Children and Youth Affairs. 2013.
Publisher:
Department of Children and Youth Affairs
Issue Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/555696
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Growing Up in Ireland is the national longitudinal study of children. Its core objectives include describing the children of Ireland, looking at how early experiences affect later outcomes and providing an evidence-base that can be used to inform child and family policies. It has two cohorts of children. The first is referred to as the Infant Cohort and is based on just over 11,100 children and their families. The families in this cohort were first interviewed between September 2008 and April 2009, when the Study Children were nine months old; a second interview took place between December 2010 and June 2011, when they were three years of age. It is these 9,793 children who are the subject of this report. This report, and the Growing Up in Ireland study more generally, draws on Bronfenbrenner’s model (e.g. 1979) of the individual as developing within a series of contexts that vary in the strength of their influence, as well as interacting with each other. For example, parents (within the family context) control many of the key aspects of the child’s everyday life but their parenting decisions and capacity may in turn be affected by the wider economic climate. The broad picture of the Study Children at three years of age presented in this report focuses first on the child’s outcomes and well-being before considering three of the more influential contexts (parenting, childcare and financial circumstances) in which their development is taking place.
Keywords:
YOUNG PEOPLE; CHILD HEALTH; WELL-BEING; PSYCHOLOGY
Series/Report no.:
5
ISBN:
978-1-4064-2776-9
Sponsors:
Funder: Growing Up in Ireland is wholly funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, in association with the Department of Social Protection and the Central Statistics Office. The study is being carried out by a consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) and Trinity College Dublin (TCD).

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Aislingen
dc.contributor.authorMcCrory, Cathalen
dc.contributor.authorMcNally, Sineaden
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-25T15:25:06Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-25T15:25:06Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09en
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, James et al [2013]. Growing Up in Ireland national longitudinal study of children: development from birth to three years infant cohort. Report 5. Dublin: Department of Children and Youth Affairs. 2013.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4064-2776-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/555696en
dc.descriptionGrowing Up in Ireland is the national longitudinal study of children. Its core objectives include describing the children of Ireland, looking at how early experiences affect later outcomes and providing an evidence-base that can be used to inform child and family policies. It has two cohorts of children. The first is referred to as the Infant Cohort and is based on just over 11,100 children and their families. The families in this cohort were first interviewed between September 2008 and April 2009, when the Study Children were nine months old; a second interview took place between December 2010 and June 2011, when they were three years of age. It is these 9,793 children who are the subject of this report. This report, and the Growing Up in Ireland study more generally, draws on Bronfenbrenner’s model (e.g. 1979) of the individual as developing within a series of contexts that vary in the strength of their influence, as well as interacting with each other. For example, parents (within the family context) control many of the key aspects of the child’s everyday life but their parenting decisions and capacity may in turn be affected by the wider economic climate. The broad picture of the Study Children at three years of age presented in this report focuses first on the child’s outcomes and well-being before considering three of the more influential contexts (parenting, childcare and financial circumstances) in which their development is taking place.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunder: Growing Up in Ireland is wholly funded by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, in association with the Department of Social Protection and the Central Statistics Office. The study is being carried out by a consortium of researchers led by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) and Trinity College Dublin (TCD).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Children and Youth Affairsen
dc.relation.ispartofGrowing Up In Ireland National Longitudinal Study of Childrenen
dc.relation.ispartofseries5en
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen
dc.subjectWELL-BEINGen
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGYen
dc.titleGrowing Up in Ireland national longitudinal study of children: development from birth to three years infant cohort.en
dc.title.alternativeReport 5. Executive Summary included as a separate document.en
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentESRI; TCDen
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