Acute Hospital Division Operational Plan 2015

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/552508
Title:
Acute Hospital Division Operational Plan 2015
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/552508
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The implementation of the Government’s decision to reorganise the acute hospital system is a key prior ity in the reform of acute hospitals. The Hospital Groups will continue to develop and progress the recommendations and associated governance and manag ement arrangements of the report The Establishment of Hospital Groups as a Transition to Independent Hospital Trusts. There are forty eight acute hospitals that form the seven Hospital Groups that provide the broad range of inpatient, outpatient, e mergency and diagnostic services providing acute services fo r a population of almost 4.6m.The analysis of demog raphic change shows that Ireland is ageing faster than the rest of Europe. It is this growth in ageing which has the highest impact on demand for services. Activity bas ed funding data indicates that complexity of cases is rising. The demographic profile of emergency admissions sup ports the demographic trend that the very elderly ( 85 years and over) population is growing by about 4.5% per annum in recent years with the use of hospital bed days by the very elderly (85 years and over) up on average over 6% between 2011 and 2013. One of the challenges facing the acute hospitals is that curre nt capacity in community services is insufficient t o meet growing demands associated with demographic pressur es and which gives rise to inappropriate levels of admission to and delayed discharges from acute hosp itals. This in turn negatively impacts on costs and key performance indicators in acute hospitals, in parti cular where elective work is concerned
Keywords:
HOSPITAL; ACUTE CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-08T14:13:05Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-08T14:13:05Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/552508en
dc.descriptionThe implementation of the Government’s decision to reorganise the acute hospital system is a key prior ity in the reform of acute hospitals. The Hospital Groups will continue to develop and progress the recommendations and associated governance and manag ement arrangements of the report The Establishment of Hospital Groups as a Transition to Independent Hospital Trusts. There are forty eight acute hospitals that form the seven Hospital Groups that provide the broad range of inpatient, outpatient, e mergency and diagnostic services providing acute services fo r a population of almost 4.6m.The analysis of demog raphic change shows that Ireland is ageing faster than the rest of Europe. It is this growth in ageing which has the highest impact on demand for services. Activity bas ed funding data indicates that complexity of cases is rising. The demographic profile of emergency admissions sup ports the demographic trend that the very elderly ( 85 years and over) population is growing by about 4.5% per annum in recent years with the use of hospital bed days by the very elderly (85 years and over) up on average over 6% between 2011 and 2013. One of the challenges facing the acute hospitals is that curre nt capacity in community services is insufficient t o meet growing demands associated with demographic pressur es and which gives rise to inappropriate levels of admission to and delayed discharges from acute hosp itals. This in turn negatively impacts on costs and key performance indicators in acute hospitals, in parti cular where elective work is concerneden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectHOSPITALen
dc.subjectACUTE CAREen
dc.titleAcute Hospital Division Operational Plan 2015en
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.