Short-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348577
Title:
Short-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women.
Authors:
Madden, J M; O'Flynn, A M; Dolan, E; Fitzgerald, A P; Kearney, P M
Citation:
Short-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women. 2015: J Hum Hypertens
Journal:
Journal of human hypertension
Issue Date:
19-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348577
DOI:
10.1038/jhh.2015.18
PubMed ID:
25787777
Abstract:
Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with cardiovascular events; however, the prognostic significance of short-term BPV remains uncertain. As uncertainty also remains as to which measure of variability most accurately describes short-term BPV, this study explores different indices and investigates their relationship with subclinical target organ damage (TOD). We used data from the Mitchelstown Study, a cross-sectional study of Irish adults aged 47-73 years (n=2047). A subsample (1207) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). As measures of short-term BPV, we estimated the s.d., weighted s.d. (wSD), coefficient of variation (CV) and average real variability (ARV). TOD was documented by microalbuminuria and electrocardiogram (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). There was no association found between any measure of BPV and LVH in both unadjusted and fully adjusted logistic regression models. Similar analysis found that ARV (24 h, day and night), s.d. (day and night) and wSD were all univariately associated with microalbuminuria and remained associated after adjustment for age, gender, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and antihypertensive treatment. However, when the models were further adjusted for the mean BP the association did not persist for all indices. Our findings illustrate choosing the appropriate summary measure, which accurately captures that short-term BPV is difficult. Despite discrepancies in values between the different measures, there was no association between any indexes of variability with TOD measures after adjustment for the mean BP.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 19 March 2015; doi:10.1038/jhh.2015.18.
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-5527

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMadden, J Men
dc.contributor.authorO'Flynn, A Men
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Een
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, A Pen
dc.contributor.authorKearney, P Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-07T14:17:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-07T14:17:34Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-19en
dc.identifier.citationShort-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women. 2015: J Hum Hypertensen
dc.identifier.issn1476-5527en
dc.identifier.pmid25787777en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/jhh.2015.18en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/348577en
dc.description.abstractBlood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with cardiovascular events; however, the prognostic significance of short-term BPV remains uncertain. As uncertainty also remains as to which measure of variability most accurately describes short-term BPV, this study explores different indices and investigates their relationship with subclinical target organ damage (TOD). We used data from the Mitchelstown Study, a cross-sectional study of Irish adults aged 47-73 years (n=2047). A subsample (1207) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). As measures of short-term BPV, we estimated the s.d., weighted s.d. (wSD), coefficient of variation (CV) and average real variability (ARV). TOD was documented by microalbuminuria and electrocardiogram (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). There was no association found between any measure of BPV and LVH in both unadjusted and fully adjusted logistic regression models. Similar analysis found that ARV (24 h, day and night), s.d. (day and night) and wSD were all univariately associated with microalbuminuria and remained associated after adjustment for age, gender, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and antihypertensive treatment. However, when the models were further adjusted for the mean BP the association did not persist for all indices. Our findings illustrate choosing the appropriate summary measure, which accurately captures that short-term BPV is difficult. Despite discrepancies in values between the different measures, there was no association between any indexes of variability with TOD measures after adjustment for the mean BP.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 19 March 2015; doi:10.1038/jhh.2015.18.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of human hypertensionen
dc.titleShort-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of human hypertensionen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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