Crucial design issues for special access technology; a Delphi study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348564
Title:
Crucial design issues for special access technology; a Delphi study
Authors:
O‟Rourke, Pearl; Ekins, R.; Timmins, B; Timmins, Fiona; Long, Siobhan; Coyle, Eugene
Affiliation:
1Department of Applied Technology, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 4Enable Ireland, 3Directorate of Research and Enterprise, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland
Citation:
O'Rourke, P., Ekins, R., Timmins, B., Timmins, F., Long, S. and Coyle, E. Crucial design issues for special access technology; a Delphi study. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Informa Healthcare, July 2013. http://informahealthcare.com/journal/idt
Journal:
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Issue Date:
7-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348564
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a method to involve professional users of assistive technology (AT) in the development process of customisable products. Employing the ideas of user participation and mass customisation, this research addresses the need for reduced product costs and optimised product flexibility. Method. An adaptable six-question Delphi study was developed to establish consensus among AT professionals on design issues relating to a specified AT domain requiring innovation. The study is demonstrated for the special access technology (SAT) domain. A modified morphological matrix structures the application of the study results to the product design process Results. 14 Professionals from the Republic of Ireland and the UK participated. Consensus was reached on prevalent parts of SAT that malfunction, primary reasons for SAT malfunction, characteristics of clients associated with SAT selection, client needs regarding SAT use and training, desirable traits of SAT, and clinicians‟ frustrations with SAT. Conclusion. The study revealed a range of problems related to SAT, highlighting the complexities of successful SAT adoption. The questions led to differentiated insights and enabled design solution conceptualisation from various perspectives. The approach was found to help facilitate efficient generation and application of professional users‟ knowledge during the design process of customisable AT.
Keywords:
TECHNOLOGY; ACCESS TO SERVICES
Local subject classification:
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO‟Rourke, Pearlen
dc.contributor.authorEkins, R.en
dc.contributor.authorTimmins, Ben
dc.contributor.authorTimmins, Fionaen
dc.contributor.authorLong, Siobhanen
dc.contributor.authorCoyle, Eugeneen
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-07T13:37:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-07T13:37:13Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-07en
dc.identifier.citationO'Rourke, P., Ekins, R., Timmins, B., Timmins, F., Long, S. and Coyle, E. Crucial design issues for special access technology; a Delphi study. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Informa Healthcare, July 2013. http://informahealthcare.com/journal/idten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/348564en
dc.descriptionPurpose. To develop and demonstrate a method to involve professional users of assistive technology (AT) in the development process of customisable products. Employing the ideas of user participation and mass customisation, this research addresses the need for reduced product costs and optimised product flexibility. Method. An adaptable six-question Delphi study was developed to establish consensus among AT professionals on design issues relating to a specified AT domain requiring innovation. The study is demonstrated for the special access technology (SAT) domain. A modified morphological matrix structures the application of the study results to the product design process Results. 14 Professionals from the Republic of Ireland and the UK participated. Consensus was reached on prevalent parts of SAT that malfunction, primary reasons for SAT malfunction, characteristics of clients associated with SAT selection, client needs regarding SAT use and training, desirable traits of SAT, and clinicians‟ frustrations with SAT. Conclusion. The study revealed a range of problems related to SAT, highlighting the complexities of successful SAT adoption. The questions led to differentiated insights and enabled design solution conceptualisation from various perspectives. The approach was found to help facilitate efficient generation and application of professional users‟ knowledge during the design process of customisable AT.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGYen
dc.subjectACCESS TO SERVICESen
dc.subject.otherASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGYen
dc.titleCrucial design issues for special access technology; a Delphi studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Department of Applied Technology, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 4Enable Ireland, 3Directorate of Research and Enterprise, Dublin Institute of Technology, Irelanden
dc.identifier.journalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technologyen
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