Place of care: from referral to specialist palliative care until death.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348560
Title:
Place of care: from referral to specialist palliative care until death.
Authors:
O'Leary, Mary Jane; O'Brien, Alison C; Murphy, Marie; Crowley, Claire M; Leahy, Helen M; McCarthy, Jill M; Collins, Joan C; O'Brien, Tony
Citation:
Place of care: from referral to specialist palliative care until death. 2014: BMJ Support Palliat Care
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Journal:
BMJ supportive & palliative care
Issue Date:
8-Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/348560
DOI:
10.1136/bmjspcare-2014-000696
PubMed ID:
25492417
Additional Links:
http://spcare.bmj.com/content/early/2012/11/20/bmjspcare-2012-000281
Abstract:
While there are many poorly standardised studies focusing on place of death, there are limited data on place(s) of care during the final stages of disease.; This study aims to identify where patients are cared for in the interval from referral to specialist palliative care until death.; All patients who died while under the care of a specialist palliative care service over a 6-month period were considered.; Of the 507 patients included, 255 (50.3%) were men and 428 (84.4%) had a malignant diagnosis. The mean referral-to-death interval was 70 days (SD 113, Range 1-838). The majority (n=281, 55.4%) received care in a single care setting-hospital (28.4%), home (21.5%), nursing home/community hospital (4.1%), hospice (1.4%)-and had a shorter mean referral-to-death interval. Most patients with more than one care setting spent three-quarters of their time in their normal place of residence. A total of 199 (39.3%) died in hospital, 131 (25.8%) in hospice, 131 (25.8%) at home (25.8%) and 46 (9.1%) in a nursing home/community hospital. Patients referred by a general practitioner (n=80 patients, 15.8%) were more likely to be cared for at home (p<0.001), and die at home (p<0.001).; A significant number of patients received specialist palliative care across multiple care settings. Late referral is associated with a single domain of care. General practitioner involvement supports patient care and death at home. Place of care and ease of transfer between care settings may be better indicators of the quality of care we provide.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Background: While there are many poorly standardised studies focusing on place of death, there are limited data on place(s) of care during the final stages of disease. AIM: This study aims to identify where patients are cared for in the interval from referral to specialist palliative care until death. METHODS: All patients who died while under the care of a specialist palliative care service over a 6-month period were considered. RESULTS: Of the 507 patients included, 255 (50.3%) were men and 428 (84.4%) had a malignant diagnosis. The mean referral-to-death interval was 70 days (SD 113, Range 1-838). The majority (n=281, 55.4%) received care in a single care setting-hospital (28.4%), home (21.5%), nursing home/community hospital (4.1%), hospice (1.4%)-and had a shorter mean referral-to-death interval. Most patients with more than one care setting spent three-quarters of their time in their normal place of residence. A total of 199 (39.3%) died in hospital, 131 (25.8%) in hospice, 131 (25.8%) at home (25.8%) and 46 (9.1%) in a nursing home/community hospital. Patients referred by a general practitioner (n=80 patients, 15.8%) were more likely to be cared for at home (p<0.001), and die at home (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of patients received specialist palliative care across multiple care settings. Late referral is associated with a single domain of care. General practitioner involvement supports patient care and death at home. Place of care and ease of transfer between care settings may be better indicators of the quality of care we provide. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
Keywords:
PALLIATIVE CARE; COMMUNICATION; HOSPICE; HOME CARE
ISSN:
2045-4368

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Mary Janeen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Alison Cen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Marieen
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Claire Men
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Helen Men
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Jill Men
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Joan Cen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Tonyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-07T09:15:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-07T09:15:36Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-08en
dc.identifier.citationPlace of care: from referral to specialist palliative care until death. 2014: BMJ Support Palliat Careen
dc.identifier.issn2045-4368en
dc.identifier.pmid25492417en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjspcare-2014-000696en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/348560en
dc.descriptionBackground: While there are many poorly standardised studies focusing on place of death, there are limited data on place(s) of care during the final stages of disease. AIM: This study aims to identify where patients are cared for in the interval from referral to specialist palliative care until death. METHODS: All patients who died while under the care of a specialist palliative care service over a 6-month period were considered. RESULTS: Of the 507 patients included, 255 (50.3%) were men and 428 (84.4%) had a malignant diagnosis. The mean referral-to-death interval was 70 days (SD 113, Range 1-838). The majority (n=281, 55.4%) received care in a single care setting-hospital (28.4%), home (21.5%), nursing home/community hospital (4.1%), hospice (1.4%)-and had a shorter mean referral-to-death interval. Most patients with more than one care setting spent three-quarters of their time in their normal place of residence. A total of 199 (39.3%) died in hospital, 131 (25.8%) in hospice, 131 (25.8%) at home (25.8%) and 46 (9.1%) in a nursing home/community hospital. Patients referred by a general practitioner (n=80 patients, 15.8%) were more likely to be cared for at home (p<0.001), and die at home (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of patients received specialist palliative care across multiple care settings. Late referral is associated with a single domain of care. General practitioner involvement supports patient care and death at home. Place of care and ease of transfer between care settings may be better indicators of the quality of care we provide. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.en
dc.description.abstractWhile there are many poorly standardised studies focusing on place of death, there are limited data on place(s) of care during the final stages of disease.en
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to identify where patients are cared for in the interval from referral to specialist palliative care until death.en
dc.description.abstractAll patients who died while under the care of a specialist palliative care service over a 6-month period were considered.en
dc.description.abstractOf the 507 patients included, 255 (50.3%) were men and 428 (84.4%) had a malignant diagnosis. The mean referral-to-death interval was 70 days (SD 113, Range 1-838). The majority (n=281, 55.4%) received care in a single care setting-hospital (28.4%), home (21.5%), nursing home/community hospital (4.1%), hospice (1.4%)-and had a shorter mean referral-to-death interval. Most patients with more than one care setting spent three-quarters of their time in their normal place of residence. A total of 199 (39.3%) died in hospital, 131 (25.8%) in hospice, 131 (25.8%) at home (25.8%) and 46 (9.1%) in a nursing home/community hospital. Patients referred by a general practitioner (n=80 patients, 15.8%) were more likely to be cared for at home (p<0.001), and die at home (p<0.001).en
dc.description.abstractA significant number of patients received specialist palliative care across multiple care settings. Late referral is associated with a single domain of care. General practitioner involvement supports patient care and death at home. Place of care and ease of transfer between care settings may be better indicators of the quality of care we provide.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://spcare.bmj.com/content/early/2012/11/20/bmjspcare-2012-000281en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ supportive & palliative careen
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen
dc.subjectCOMMUNICATIONen
dc.subjectHOSPICEen
dc.subjectHOME CAREen
dc.titlePlace of care: from referral to specialist palliative care until death.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ supportive & palliative careen
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