Alcohol screening among opioid agonist patients in a primary care clinic and an opioid treatment program

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/346209
Title:
Alcohol screening among opioid agonist patients in a primary care clinic and an opioid treatment program
Authors:
Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis
Citation:
Klimas, J. et al., 2015. Alcohol screening among opioid agonist patients in a primary care clinic and an opioid treatment program. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 47 (1):65
Journal:
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
Issue Date:
25-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/346209
DOI:
10.1080/02791072.2014.991859
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02791072.2014.991859
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n =208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. Among the patients treated in the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counsellors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested organizational, structural, provider, patient and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.
Keywords:
ADDICTION; ALCOHOL MISUSE; DRUG
ISSN:
0279-1072; 2159-9777
Sponsors:
An INVEST Fellowship from the National Institute on Drug Abuse supported this analysis. Additional support was provided through the Western States Node of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trial Network (U10 DA015815), an award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for SBIRT Oregon (TI020272), and from the ELEVATE: Irish Research Council International Career Development Fellowship— co-funded by Marie Cure Actions (ELEVATEPD/2014/6). The authors report no additional potential conflicts.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKlimas, Janen
dc.contributor.authorMuench, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorWiest, Katharinaen
dc.contributor.authorCroff, Rainaen
dc.contributor.authorRieckman, Tracien
dc.contributor.authorMcCarty, Dennisen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-05T12:37:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-05T12:37:23Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-25en
dc.identifier.citationKlimas, J. et al., 2015. Alcohol screening among opioid agonist patients in a primary care clinic and an opioid treatment program. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 47 (1):65en
dc.identifier.issn0279-1072en
dc.identifier.issn2159-9777en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02791072.2014.991859en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/346209en
dc.descriptionProblem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n =208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. Among the patients treated in the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counsellors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested organizational, structural, provider, patient and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAn INVEST Fellowship from the National Institute on Drug Abuse supported this analysis. Additional support was provided through the Western States Node of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trial Network (U10 DA015815), an award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for SBIRT Oregon (TI020272), and from the ELEVATE: Irish Research Council International Career Development Fellowship— co-funded by Marie Cure Actions (ELEVATEPD/2014/6). The authors report no additional potential conflicts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02791072.2014.991859en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Psychoactive Drugsen
dc.subjectADDICTIONen
dc.subjectALCOHOL MISUSEen
dc.subjectDRUGen
dc.titleAlcohol screening among opioid agonist patients in a primary care clinic and an opioid treatment programen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Psychoactive Drugsen
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