Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337753
Title:
Homicide in Ireland 1972-1991
Authors:
Dooley, Enda
Affiliation:
Department of Justice.
Citation:
Dooley, E., 1995. Homicide in Ireland 1972-1991. Dublin: Department of Justice.
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337753
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
While crime rates have undoubtedly increased this has been predominantly in the area of property crime. While violent crime has increased this has not been mirrored in an increase in the overall homicide rate as stated in official statistics Notwithstanding this apparent stasis in the level of homicide we have little information of a scientific nature on the patterns of homicide within. our society, whether these have changed over this period of social change, and whether the pattern of homicide in this country differs from that in other jurisdictions. Homicide crimes by their serious nature absorb large amounts of police resources in their detection, of court time and resources in trial, and on conviction these crimes are likely to attract lengthy prison sentences. Apart from mere scientific curiosity there is a practical benefit to police, courts, and prison service in having an accurate base of information which, for example, may facilitate detection and subsequent sentence and rehabilitation planning. To date this criminological database has been lacking in Ireland'. Other jurisdictions do undertake analysis of homicides rates and trends. Review of the scientific research literature on the subject;" reveals a relative paucity of systematic descriptive studies of homicide in the European context, with the possible exception of the Scandinavian countries. The few comprehensive studies that have been undertaken are often limited to a review of completed murders, i.e. court. decisions of murder, rather than the broader phenomenon of homicide. The present. study aims to attempt to bridge this gap in criminological knowledge in the Irish context: This study is limited to a description of the characteristics of homicide occurring in Ireland. It does not purport to comprehensively review and discuss the legal issues involved in homicide such as degrees of responsibility, etc.
Keywords:
CRIME; CRIME PREVENTION; VIOLENCE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDooley, Endaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-02T13:18:32Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-02T13:18:32Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.citationDooley, E., 1995. Homicide in Ireland 1972-1991. Dublin: Department of Justice.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/337753-
dc.descriptionWhile crime rates have undoubtedly increased this has been predominantly in the area of property crime. While violent crime has increased this has not been mirrored in an increase in the overall homicide rate as stated in official statistics Notwithstanding this apparent stasis in the level of homicide we have little information of a scientific nature on the patterns of homicide within. our society, whether these have changed over this period of social change, and whether the pattern of homicide in this country differs from that in other jurisdictions. Homicide crimes by their serious nature absorb large amounts of police resources in their detection, of court time and resources in trial, and on conviction these crimes are likely to attract lengthy prison sentences. Apart from mere scientific curiosity there is a practical benefit to police, courts, and prison service in having an accurate base of information which, for example, may facilitate detection and subsequent sentence and rehabilitation planning. To date this criminological database has been lacking in Ireland'. Other jurisdictions do undertake analysis of homicides rates and trends. Review of the scientific research literature on the subject;" reveals a relative paucity of systematic descriptive studies of homicide in the European context, with the possible exception of the Scandinavian countries. The few comprehensive studies that have been undertaken are often limited to a review of completed murders, i.e. court. decisions of murder, rather than the broader phenomenon of homicide. The present. study aims to attempt to bridge this gap in criminological knowledge in the Irish context: This study is limited to a description of the characteristics of homicide occurring in Ireland. It does not purport to comprehensively review and discuss the legal issues involved in homicide such as degrees of responsibility, etc.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.subjectCRIMEen_GB
dc.subjectCRIME PREVENTIONen_GB
dc.subjectVIOLENCEen_GB
dc.titleHomicide in Ireland 1972-1991en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Justice.en_GB
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