Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337581
Title:
Disability, access to education and future opportunities.
Authors:
Kitchin, Rob; Mulcahy, Frank
Affiliation:
Combat Poverty Agency.
Citation:
Kitchin, R. & Mulcahy, F., 1998. Disability, access to education and future opportunities. Dublin: Combat Poverty Agency.
Publisher:
Combat Poverty Agency
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337581
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Access to education for disabled children is an emotive issue. Education policy advisors, the government, teachers, parents, and children themselves, often hold strong and, in many cases, principled opinions on how disabled children should be educated. Viewpoints are often conflicting with some favouring the separation of non-disabled and disabled children into a segregated system of mainstream and 'special' schools, and others advocating an inclusive education system where disabled and non-disabled children share the same school environment, although not necessarily the same classroom. The former position, that of separation, supplemented in the past couple of decades by remedial teaching, has been the traditional model in most Western countries, including Ireland.
Keywords:
DISABILITY; EDUCATION; SOCIAL EXCLUSION
Sponsors:
Royal Irish Academy and the Combat Poverty Agency Public Awareness Grant.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKitchin, Roben_GB
dc.contributor.authorMulcahy, Franken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T13:09:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-23T13:09:21Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationKitchin, R. & Mulcahy, F., 1998. Disability, access to education and future opportunities. Dublin: Combat Poverty Agency.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/337581-
dc.descriptionAccess to education for disabled children is an emotive issue. Education policy advisors, the government, teachers, parents, and children themselves, often hold strong and, in many cases, principled opinions on how disabled children should be educated. Viewpoints are often conflicting with some favouring the separation of non-disabled and disabled children into a segregated system of mainstream and 'special' schools, and others advocating an inclusive education system where disabled and non-disabled children share the same school environment, although not necessarily the same classroom. The former position, that of separation, supplemented in the past couple of decades by remedial teaching, has been the traditional model in most Western countries, including Ireland.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipRoyal Irish Academy and the Combat Poverty Agency Public Awareness Grant.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCombat Poverty Agencyen_GB
dc.subjectDISABILITYen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.titleDisability, access to education and future opportunities.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentCombat Poverty Agency.en_GB
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