Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337578
Title:
People like us: disability: the people and the facts.
Authors:
Dempsey, Anne
Citation:
Dempsey, A., 1982. People like us: disability: the people and the facts. Dublin: Union of Voluntary Organisation for the Handicapped.
Publisher:
Union of Voluntary Organisation for the Handicapped; Health Education Bureau.
Issue Date:
Nov-1982
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/337578
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Much is known nowadays about the causes of diseases and their effects on the human body. Most of that knowledge, however, is tied up in a technical language, which this book attempts to simplify. The diseases and disabilities dealt with here account for the substantial numbers of people we loosely call 'the disabled population'. Knowing about the causes of disability is good. Our knowledge is expanded when we read about the various types of mental illness, the differing degrees of mental handicap, the pain of arthritis, the difficulty of getting about by wheelchair. But knowledge should not be an end in itself. We see such general information as being the first step to a realisation that disability means 'people'. Throughout your reading of this book, we would ask you to bear in mind that there is close by you at least one neighbour, friend or colleague with a first-hand experience of what you may be learning about through these pages. The scientific explanations of what diseases do to the many complicated systems of the body are the present state of truth so far. However, even as these words are being written, research is in progress leading to new discoveries capable of changing part of the picture of our present understanding. But while our knowledge of diseases and methods of treatment continue to advance, very little is known about the resilience of people with a disability, and the courage they show in getting on with their lives in spite of their disability. Just when you would expect someone to be beaten by the cruel stroke of fate that has selected them for a particular disability, these people assume a new strength of purpose, a new dignity and prominence as people remarkably talented and resourceful. One of the most famous of such people is Helen Keller, but there are thousands more unknown disabled people who show unsung valour in their daily lives. Throughout these pages, you will learn about the resourcefulness that carves out a tolerable lifestyle against the odds of being disabled. You should also gather something of the sense of purpose and fulfilment which can exist, no matter how major the form of disability.
Keywords:
DISEASE; DISABILITY; PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY; HEALTH STATUS
Local subject classification:
PHYSICAL HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDempsey, Anneen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T12:11:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-23T12:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued1982-11-
dc.identifier.citationDempsey, A., 1982. People like us: disability: the people and the facts. Dublin: Union of Voluntary Organisation for the Handicapped.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/337578-
dc.descriptionMuch is known nowadays about the causes of diseases and their effects on the human body. Most of that knowledge, however, is tied up in a technical language, which this book attempts to simplify. The diseases and disabilities dealt with here account for the substantial numbers of people we loosely call 'the disabled population'. Knowing about the causes of disability is good. Our knowledge is expanded when we read about the various types of mental illness, the differing degrees of mental handicap, the pain of arthritis, the difficulty of getting about by wheelchair. But knowledge should not be an end in itself. We see such general information as being the first step to a realisation that disability means 'people'. Throughout your reading of this book, we would ask you to bear in mind that there is close by you at least one neighbour, friend or colleague with a first-hand experience of what you may be learning about through these pages. The scientific explanations of what diseases do to the many complicated systems of the body are the present state of truth so far. However, even as these words are being written, research is in progress leading to new discoveries capable of changing part of the picture of our present understanding. But while our knowledge of diseases and methods of treatment continue to advance, very little is known about the resilience of people with a disability, and the courage they show in getting on with their lives in spite of their disability. Just when you would expect someone to be beaten by the cruel stroke of fate that has selected them for a particular disability, these people assume a new strength of purpose, a new dignity and prominence as people remarkably talented and resourceful. One of the most famous of such people is Helen Keller, but there are thousands more unknown disabled people who show unsung valour in their daily lives. Throughout these pages, you will learn about the resourcefulness that carves out a tolerable lifestyle against the odds of being disabled. You should also gather something of the sense of purpose and fulfilment which can exist, no matter how major the form of disability.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUnion of Voluntary Organisation for the Handicapped; Health Education Bureau.en_GB
dc.subjectDISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectDISABILITYen_GB
dc.subjectPEOPLE WITH DISABILITYen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH STATUSen_GB
dc.subject.otherPHYSICAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.titlePeople like us: disability: the people and the facts.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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