An exploration of the experiences of mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336406
Title:
An exploration of the experiences of mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death
Authors:
McGuinness, D; Coghlan, B; Butler, Michelle
Affiliation:
National Maternity Hospital, Holles St. UCD School of Nursing Midwifery and Health Systems,The University of British Columbia.
Citation:
McGuinness D, Coughlan B, Butler M. (2014) An exploration of the experiences of mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death. Evidence Based Midwifery 12(2): 65-70
Publisher:
Royal College of Midwives
Journal:
Evidence Based Midwifery
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336406
Abstract:
Objective. To explore the experiences of bereaved mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage (>20 weeks), stillbirth or neonatal death. Method. A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used involving in-depth interviews with 15 bereaved mothers, who attended a maternity hospital in Dublin. Data were collected from January to August 2012. Findings. Three key themes were identified: (1) suppression of lactation following the loss of a baby: silent tears; (2) mothering; (3) supportive care needs and the bereaved mother’s experience. This paper focuses on the first global theme. The majority of bereaved mothers found engorgement and leaking milk particularly challenging both physically and emotionally following the loss of their baby; especially as their baby’s funeral or wake took place during this period. The study highlights a number of areas where women could be better prepared for this experience. Conclusion. The findings highlight that the majority of bereaved mothers will require improved guidance and support with their breast care needs following the loss of their baby with awareness and sensitivity to their shortened motherhood.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY; BEREAVEMENT; NEONATE; DEATH; MOTHER
Sponsors:
The principal author is grateful to the National Maternity Hospital and the Irish Hospice Foundation for providing finance towards this MSc research study.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGuinness, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoghlan, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorButler, Michelleen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-01T14:57:52Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-01T14:57:52Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationMcGuinness D, Coughlan B, Butler M. (2014) An exploration of the experiences of mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death. Evidence Based Midwifery 12(2): 65-70en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/336406-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To explore the experiences of bereaved mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage (>20 weeks), stillbirth or neonatal death. Method. A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used involving in-depth interviews with 15 bereaved mothers, who attended a maternity hospital in Dublin. Data were collected from January to August 2012. Findings. Three key themes were identified: (1) suppression of lactation following the loss of a baby: silent tears; (2) mothering; (3) supportive care needs and the bereaved mother’s experience. This paper focuses on the first global theme. The majority of bereaved mothers found engorgement and leaking milk particularly challenging both physically and emotionally following the loss of their baby; especially as their baby’s funeral or wake took place during this period. The study highlights a number of areas where women could be better prepared for this experience. Conclusion. The findings highlight that the majority of bereaved mothers will require improved guidance and support with their breast care needs following the loss of their baby with awareness and sensitivity to their shortened motherhood.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThe principal author is grateful to the National Maternity Hospital and the Irish Hospice Foundation for providing finance towards this MSc research study.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal College of Midwivesen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subjectBEREAVEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectNEONATEen_GB
dc.subjectDEATHen_GB
dc.subjectMOTHERen_GB
dc.titleAn exploration of the experiences of mothers as they suppress lactation following late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal deathen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Maternity Hospital, Holles St. UCD School of Nursing Midwifery and Health Systems,The University of British Columbia.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEvidence Based Midwiferyen_GB
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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