Sleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336276
Title:
Sleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Authors:
Crinion, Sophie J; McNicholas, Walter T
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders Unit, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Sleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 2014, 8 (1):79-88 Expert Rev Respir Med
Journal:
Expert review of respiratory medicine
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336276
DOI:
10.1586/17476348.2014.860357
PubMed ID:
24378218
Abstract:
Sleep may have several negative consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Sleep is typically fragmented with diminished slow wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep, which likely represents an important contributing factor to daytime symptoms such as fatigue and lethargy. Furthermore, normal physiological adaptations during sleep, which result in mild hypoventilation in normal subjects, are more pronounced in COPD, which can result in clinically important nocturnal oxygen desaturation. The co-existence of obstructive sleep apnea and COPD is also common, principally because of the high prevalence of each disorder, and there is little convincing evidence that one disorder predisposes to the other. Nonetheless, this co-existence, termed the overlap syndrome, typically results in more pronounced nocturnal oxygen desaturation and there is a high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in such patients. Management of sleep disorders in patients with COPD should address both sleep quality and disordered gas exchange. Non-invasive pressure support is beneficial in selected cases, particularly during acute exacerbations associated with respiratory failure, and is particularly helpful in patients with the overlap syndrome. There is limited evidence of benefit from pressure support in the chronic setting in COPD patients without obstructive sleep apnea.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Comorbidity; Disease Management; Fatigue; Humans; Hypertension, Pulmonary; Hypoventilation; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Sleep Disorders
ISSN:
1747-6356

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrinion, Sophie Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Walter Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-27T16:49:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-27T16:49:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-02-
dc.identifier.citationSleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 2014, 8 (1):79-88 Expert Rev Respir Meden_GB
dc.identifier.issn1747-6356-
dc.identifier.pmid24378218-
dc.identifier.doi10.1586/17476348.2014.860357-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/336276-
dc.description.abstractSleep may have several negative consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Sleep is typically fragmented with diminished slow wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep, which likely represents an important contributing factor to daytime symptoms such as fatigue and lethargy. Furthermore, normal physiological adaptations during sleep, which result in mild hypoventilation in normal subjects, are more pronounced in COPD, which can result in clinically important nocturnal oxygen desaturation. The co-existence of obstructive sleep apnea and COPD is also common, principally because of the high prevalence of each disorder, and there is little convincing evidence that one disorder predisposes to the other. Nonetheless, this co-existence, termed the overlap syndrome, typically results in more pronounced nocturnal oxygen desaturation and there is a high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in such patients. Management of sleep disorders in patients with COPD should address both sleep quality and disordered gas exchange. Non-invasive pressure support is beneficial in selected cases, particularly during acute exacerbations associated with respiratory failure, and is particularly helpful in patients with the overlap syndrome. There is limited evidence of benefit from pressure support in the chronic setting in COPD patients without obstructive sleep apnea.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Expert review of respiratory medicineen_GB
dc.subject.meshComorbidity-
dc.subject.meshDisease Management-
dc.subject.meshFatigue-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypertension, Pulmonary-
dc.subject.meshHypoventilation-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive-
dc.subject.meshSleep Disorders-
dc.titleSleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders Unit, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalExpert review of respiratory medicineen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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