Case-mix variations in ambulatory surgery: results of a cross-national study of selected countries within the European region.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336173
Title:
Case-mix variations in ambulatory surgery: results of a cross-national study of selected countries within the European region.
Authors:
Wiley, Miriam M.; Devereux, Paul
Citation:
Wiley, M., Devereux, P., 1992. Case-mix variations in ambulatory surgery: results of a cross-national study of selected countries within the European region. Dublin: Economic and Social Research Institute.
Publisher:
Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
Issue Date:
May-1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336173
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
A striking characteristic of the modern health service environment is the expansion in the use of day surgery for the delivery of increasingly sophisticated services. This expansion has been made possible by a number of factors, including advancements in technology and approaches to service delivery and is supported by the widespread recognition that treatment in the inpatient setting should be pursued only as a - last resort if other options are available and appropriate. The fact that, in recent years, there has been a shift in the balance of service delivery between inpatient and day surgery as a result of this expansion is generally recognised. While estimates for the United States indicate that approximately 40 per cent of all surgery is now being done on a day basis, there is very little empirical evidence upon whi'ch to base an accurate assessment of the magnitude of the growth in day surgery utilisation in Europe (Guterman, et al., 1988; ProPAC, 1987). In the European context, basic information on service utilisation by site of service is required, together with information on the mix of ambulatory surgical services being delivered. These issues obviously have important implications both for the pattern of delivery of specific types of surgery, together with the financial implications of service utilisation in the areas most affected by any shifts in the site of service delivery.
Keywords:
SURGERY; DAY CARE; INPATIENT SERVICES; HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT
Series/Report no.:
Technical series; No 7

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWiley, Miriam M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDevereux, Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-26T12:21:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-26T12:21:06Z-
dc.date.issued1992-05-
dc.identifier.citationWiley, M., Devereux, P., 1992. Case-mix variations in ambulatory surgery: results of a cross-national study of selected countries within the European region. Dublin: Economic and Social Research Institute.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/336173-
dc.descriptionA striking characteristic of the modern health service environment is the expansion in the use of day surgery for the delivery of increasingly sophisticated services. This expansion has been made possible by a number of factors, including advancements in technology and approaches to service delivery and is supported by the widespread recognition that treatment in the inpatient setting should be pursued only as a - last resort if other options are available and appropriate. The fact that, in recent years, there has been a shift in the balance of service delivery between inpatient and day surgery as a result of this expansion is generally recognised. While estimates for the United States indicate that approximately 40 per cent of all surgery is now being done on a day basis, there is very little empirical evidence upon whi'ch to base an accurate assessment of the magnitude of the growth in day surgery utilisation in Europe (Guterman, et al., 1988; ProPAC, 1987). In the European context, basic information on service utilisation by site of service is required, together with information on the mix of ambulatory surgical services being delivered. These issues obviously have important implications both for the pattern of delivery of specific types of surgery, together with the financial implications of service utilisation in the areas most affected by any shifts in the site of service delivery.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEconomic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical seriesen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo 7en_GB
dc.subjectSURGERYen_GB
dc.subjectDAY CAREen_GB
dc.subjectINPATIENT SERVICESen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.titleCase-mix variations in ambulatory surgery: results of a cross-national study of selected countries within the European region.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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