Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336051
Title:
Caring for people: problems and progress in implementation.
Authors:
Tobin, Mary Rose
Affiliation:
Health Services Resource Centre
Citation:
Tobin, M.R., 1993. Problems and progress in implementation. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration.
Publisher:
Institute of Public Administration (IPA)
Issue Date:
Jun-1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/336051
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The U.K. government set out its policy for improving the management and delivery of community care services in the White Paper Caring for People: Community Care in the Next Decade and Beyond, published in 1989. These reforms were due to be fully implemented on 1 st April 1993. This briefing paper reports on the introduction and implementation of these reforms. No attempt is made to draw parallels between our own system and that of the United Kingdom - indeed such parallels are difficult to draw, in that we are not comparing like with like . What the two systems can be said to have in common, however, is that they are both grappling with new ways of delivering community services to the most needy members of society - the elderly, people with mental illnesses, people with learning difficulties and the very young - and often in the most challenging of circumstances. The U.K. system just launched will make a fascinating case study when it comes to a final determination of the future structure of community care in this country. We should be prepared to benefit from their experiences and to learn from their mistakes. This paper first sets out the background to the reforms and the considers some key issues and difficulties in their implementation before concluding on the general implications of the reforms.
Keywords:
COMMUNITY CARE; CARE WORKER; COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE
Series/Report no.:
Paper; 1/93

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTobin, Mary Roseen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T10:22:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-25T10:22:27Z-
dc.date.issued1993-06-
dc.identifier.citationTobin, M.R., 1993. Problems and progress in implementation. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/336051-
dc.descriptionThe U.K. government set out its policy for improving the management and delivery of community care services in the White Paper Caring for People: Community Care in the Next Decade and Beyond, published in 1989. These reforms were due to be fully implemented on 1 st April 1993. This briefing paper reports on the introduction and implementation of these reforms. No attempt is made to draw parallels between our own system and that of the United Kingdom - indeed such parallels are difficult to draw, in that we are not comparing like with like . What the two systems can be said to have in common, however, is that they are both grappling with new ways of delivering community services to the most needy members of society - the elderly, people with mental illnesses, people with learning difficulties and the very young - and often in the most challenging of circumstances. The U.K. system just launched will make a fascinating case study when it comes to a final determination of the future structure of community care in this country. We should be prepared to benefit from their experiences and to learn from their mistakes. This paper first sets out the background to the reforms and the considers some key issues and difficulties in their implementation before concluding on the general implications of the reforms.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Public Administration (IPA)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPaperen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries1/93en_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY CAREen_GB
dc.subjectCARE WORKERen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICEen_GB
dc.titleCaring for people: problems and progress in implementation.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Services Resource Centreen_GB
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