Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/335744
Title:
A matter of rights: strategic plan 2001-2003
Authors:
National Disability Authority (NDA)
Citation:
National Disability Authority, 2001. A matter of rights: strategic plan 2001-2003. Dublin: National Disablity Authority.
Publisher:
National Disablity Authority (NDA)
Issue Date:
May-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/335744
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In the Ireland of today, over 350,000 people have a disability. People of all ages, from all walks of life in some way experience difficulties in their daily living. These difficulties are very often unnecessarily exacerbated by the society in which we live. From a late start and poor historical record, Ireland now ranks high on any list of nations considered progressive and innovative in the disability field. The Report of the Commission on the Status of People with Disabilities, and the positive reactions of all political parties to it, marked a watershed in Irish disability policy. It set a new framework of reference - a rights-based approach. However, the acknowledgement of the rights of all people with disabilities to participate fully in society is recent and society is only beginning to catch up. Justifiable expectations of equal access for all often exceed a less than perfect reality. Changes are taking place for the better but their development is a slow process. Some signs are obvious: buildings and transportation are still inaccessible to people with disabilities. Education, employment, public services, religious services, recreation and other normal everyday activities are denied, made unnecessarily difficult or are often available only in segregated circumstances. These are the more obvious manifestations of our historical neglect. Less visible, yet more difficult to counter, is the fear and ignorance of the unknown that often pervades the public perception of disability. An emphasis in the past on charity has influenced this attitude and hindered widespread recognition of the contribution and potential of people with disabilities.
Keywords:
PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY; PHYSICAL DISABILITY; LEARNING DISABILITY
Local subject classification:
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Disability Authority (NDA)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-18T12:18:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-18T12:18:10Z-
dc.date.issued2001-05-
dc.identifier.citationNational Disability Authority, 2001. A matter of rights: strategic plan 2001-2003. Dublin: National Disablity Authority.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/335744-
dc.descriptionIn the Ireland of today, over 350,000 people have a disability. People of all ages, from all walks of life in some way experience difficulties in their daily living. These difficulties are very often unnecessarily exacerbated by the society in which we live. From a late start and poor historical record, Ireland now ranks high on any list of nations considered progressive and innovative in the disability field. The Report of the Commission on the Status of People with Disabilities, and the positive reactions of all political parties to it, marked a watershed in Irish disability policy. It set a new framework of reference - a rights-based approach. However, the acknowledgement of the rights of all people with disabilities to participate fully in society is recent and society is only beginning to catch up. Justifiable expectations of equal access for all often exceed a less than perfect reality. Changes are taking place for the better but their development is a slow process. Some signs are obvious: buildings and transportation are still inaccessible to people with disabilities. Education, employment, public services, religious services, recreation and other normal everyday activities are denied, made unnecessarily difficult or are often available only in segregated circumstances. These are the more obvious manifestations of our historical neglect. Less visible, yet more difficult to counter, is the fear and ignorance of the unknown that often pervades the public perception of disability. An emphasis in the past on charity has influenced this attitude and hindered widespread recognition of the contribution and potential of people with disabilities.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Disablity Authority (NDA)en_GB
dc.subjectPEOPLE WITH DISABILITYen_GB
dc.subjectPHYSICAL DISABILITYen_GB
dc.subjectLEARNING DISABILITYen_GB
dc.subject.otherINTELLECTUAL DISABILITIESen_GB
dc.titleA matter of rights: strategic plan 2001-2003en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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