"It's our home": the quality of life in private and voluntary nursing homes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/335742
Title:
"It's our home": the quality of life in private and voluntary nursing homes.
Authors:
O'Connor, Joyce; Walsh, Marie
Citation:
O'Connor, J., Walsh, M., 1986. "It's our home": the quality of life in private and voluntary nursing homes. Dublin. National Council for the Aged.
Publisher:
National Council for the Aged
Issue Date:
1986
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/335742
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Coping with a Resident who Wants to go Home Discontentment among residents is seen as one of the most difficult situations facing a staff member. Essentially, they bear the brunt of the resident's discontent in a situation which is not of their making. Some homes deal with this problem by not accepting on a long-term basis, any resident who does not wish to stay. For this reason, in some homes, residents are accepted initially on a trial basis, and if this does not work to the satisfaction of both parties, then the resident is not accepted on a permanent basis. Some staff say that the residents are free to leave if the family are willing to take them. This is the nub of the problem as far as the staff are concerned. They must find a way of dealing with the resident who wants to go home, when their relatives are unable or unwilling to have him or her at home.
Keywords:
OLDER PEOPLE; NURSING HOMES; QUALITY OF LIFE
Series/Report no.:
Report; No 14

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Joyceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Marieen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-18T12:01:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-18T12:01:06Z-
dc.date.issued1986-
dc.identifier.citationO'Connor, J., Walsh, M., 1986. "It's our home": the quality of life in private and voluntary nursing homes. Dublin. National Council for the Aged.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/335742-
dc.descriptionCoping with a Resident who Wants to go Home Discontentment among residents is seen as one of the most difficult situations facing a staff member. Essentially, they bear the brunt of the resident's discontent in a situation which is not of their making. Some homes deal with this problem by not accepting on a long-term basis, any resident who does not wish to stay. For this reason, in some homes, residents are accepted initially on a trial basis, and if this does not work to the satisfaction of both parties, then the resident is not accepted on a permanent basis. Some staff say that the residents are free to leave if the family are willing to take them. This is the nub of the problem as far as the staff are concerned. They must find a way of dealing with the resident who wants to go home, when their relatives are unable or unwilling to have him or her at home.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Council for the Ageden_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReporten_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo 14en_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectNURSING HOMESen_GB
dc.subjectQUALITY OF LIFEen_GB
dc.title"It's our home": the quality of life in private and voluntary nursing homes.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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