Mental illness in Ireland: simulating its geographical prevalence and the role of access to services

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/334836
Title:
Mental illness in Ireland: simulating its geographical prevalence and the role of access to services
Authors:
Morrissey, Karyn; Clarke, Graham; Williamson, Paul; Daly, Antoinette; O'Donoghue, Cathal
Citation:
Morrissey, K. et al., 2014. Mental illness in Ireland: simulating its geographical prevalence and the role of access to services. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design [published online ahead of print 2014]
Publisher:
Pion
Journal:
Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design
Issue Date:
Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/334836
DOI:
10.1068/b130054p
Additional Links:
http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=b130054p
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Traditionally, Ireland has reported high rates of admissions to acute psychiatric facilities for mental illness in general. However, data limitations mean that there has been no research on the role of access and proximity on rates of admissions to acute psychiatric facilities. The Simulation Model of the Irish Local Economy (SMILE) produces synthetic small-area-level microdata on self-reported rates of depression. The National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) contains spatially referenced data on admissions to acute psychiatric services (both public and private) by diagnosis. Combining the NPIRS and SMILE datasets using propensity score-matching techniques produces a small-area profile of individuals with depression that includes those who have accessed an acute psychiatric facility as well as those who have not. Linking the NPIRS and SMILE datasets allows one to examine the differential characteristics that lead individuals with depression to seek acute psychiatric services and, importantly, to see if access to these services is a confounding factor. Our finding is that access, as measured in terms of road distance, has a significant positive impact on individuals with depression using an acute psychiatric facility.
Keywords:
MENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DISORDER; MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
ISSN:
0265-8135; 1472-3417

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Karynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Grahamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Antoinetteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Cathalen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-13T12:15:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-13T12:15:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014-10-
dc.identifier.citationMorrissey, K. et al., 2014. Mental illness in Ireland: simulating its geographical prevalence and the role of access to services. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design [published online ahead of print 2014]en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-8135-
dc.identifier.issn1472-3417-
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/b130054p-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/334836-
dc.descriptionTraditionally, Ireland has reported high rates of admissions to acute psychiatric facilities for mental illness in general. However, data limitations mean that there has been no research on the role of access and proximity on rates of admissions to acute psychiatric facilities. The Simulation Model of the Irish Local Economy (SMILE) produces synthetic small-area-level microdata on self-reported rates of depression. The National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) contains spatially referenced data on admissions to acute psychiatric services (both public and private) by diagnosis. Combining the NPIRS and SMILE datasets using propensity score-matching techniques produces a small-area profile of individuals with depression that includes those who have accessed an acute psychiatric facility as well as those who have not. Linking the NPIRS and SMILE datasets allows one to examine the differential characteristics that lead individuals with depression to seek acute psychiatric services and, importantly, to see if access to these services is a confounding factor. Our finding is that access, as measured in terms of road distance, has a significant positive impact on individuals with depression using an acute psychiatric facility.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPionen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=b130054pen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environment and Planning B: Planning and Designen_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DISORDERen_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.titleMental illness in Ireland: simulating its geographical prevalence and the role of access to servicesen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironment and Planning B: Planning and Designen_GB
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