WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: School Nutrition Environment and Body Mass Index in Primary Schools

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/334653
Title:
WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: School Nutrition Environment and Body Mass Index in Primary Schools
Authors:
Wijnhoven, Trudy; van Raaij, Joop; Sjöberg, Agneta; Eldin, Nazih; Yngve, Agneta; Kunešová, Marie; Starc, Gregor; Rito, Ana; Duleva, Vesselka; Hassapidou, Maria; Martos, Éva; Pudule, Iveta; Petrauskiene, Ausra; Sant'Angelo, Victoria; Hovengen, Ragnhild; Breda, João
Citation:
WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: School Nutrition Environment and Body Mass Index in Primary Schools 2014, 11 (11):11261 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Journal:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Issue Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/334653
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph111111261
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/11/11261/
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Schools are important settings for the promotion of a healthy diet and sufficient physical activity and thus overweight prevention. Objective: To assess differences in school nutrition environment and body mass index (BMI) in primary schools between and within 12 European countries. Methods: Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) were used (1831 and 2045 schools in 2007/2008 and 2009/2010, respectively). School personnel provided information on 18 school environmental characteristics on nutrition and physical activity. A school nutrition environment score was calculated using five nutrition-related characteristics whereby higher scores correspond to higher support for a healthy school nutrition environment. Trained field workers measured children’s weight and height; BMI-for-age (BMI/A) Z-scores were computed using the 2007 WHO growth reference and, for each school, the mean of the children’s BMI/A Z-scores was calculated. Results: Large between-country differences were found in the availability of food items on the premises (e.g., fresh fruit could be obtained in 12%−95% of schools) and school nutrition environment scores (range: 0.30−0.93). Low-score countries (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Latvia and Lithuania) graded less than three characteristics as supportive. High-score (≥0.70) countries were Ireland, Malta, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia and Sweden. The combined absence of cold drinks containing sugar, sweet snacks and salted snacks were more observed in high-score countries than in low-score countries. Largest within-country school nutrition environment scores were found in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Latvia and Lithuania. All country-level BMI/A Z-scores were positive (range: 0.20−1.02), indicating higher BMI values than the 2007 WHO growth reference. With the exception of Norway and Sweden, a country-specific association between the school nutrition environment score and the school BMI/A Z-score was not observed. Conclusions: Some European countries have implemented more school policies that are supportive to a healthy nutrition environment than others. However, most countries with low school nutrition environment scores also host schools with supportive school environment policies, suggesting that a uniform school policy to tackle the “unhealthy” school nutrition environment has not been implemented at the same level throughout a country and may underline the need for harmonized school policies.
ISSN:
1660-4601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWijnhoven, Trudyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorvan Raaij, Joopen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSjöberg, Agnetaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEldin, Nazihen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYngve, Agnetaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKunešová, Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStarc, Gregoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorRito, Anaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuleva, Vesselkaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHassapidou, Mariaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartos, Évaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPudule, Ivetaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPetrauskiene, Ausraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSant'Angelo, Victoriaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHovengen, Ragnhilden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBreda, Joãoen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-11T15:09:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-11T15:09:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-
dc.identifier.citationWHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: School Nutrition Environment and Body Mass Index in Primary Schools 2014, 11 (11):11261 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph111111261-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/334653-
dc.descriptionSchools are important settings for the promotion of a healthy diet and sufficient physical activity and thus overweight prevention. Objective: To assess differences in school nutrition environment and body mass index (BMI) in primary schools between and within 12 European countries. Methods: Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (COSI) were used (1831 and 2045 schools in 2007/2008 and 2009/2010, respectively). School personnel provided information on 18 school environmental characteristics on nutrition and physical activity. A school nutrition environment score was calculated using five nutrition-related characteristics whereby higher scores correspond to higher support for a healthy school nutrition environment. Trained field workers measured children’s weight and height; BMI-for-age (BMI/A) Z-scores were computed using the 2007 WHO growth reference and, for each school, the mean of the children’s BMI/A Z-scores was calculated. Results: Large between-country differences were found in the availability of food items on the premises (e.g., fresh fruit could be obtained in 12%−95% of schools) and school nutrition environment scores (range: 0.30−0.93). Low-score countries (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Latvia and Lithuania) graded less than three characteristics as supportive. High-score (≥0.70) countries were Ireland, Malta, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia and Sweden. The combined absence of cold drinks containing sugar, sweet snacks and salted snacks were more observed in high-score countries than in low-score countries. Largest within-country school nutrition environment scores were found in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Latvia and Lithuania. All country-level BMI/A Z-scores were positive (range: 0.20−1.02), indicating higher BMI values than the 2007 WHO growth reference. With the exception of Norway and Sweden, a country-specific association between the school nutrition environment score and the school BMI/A Z-score was not observed. Conclusions: Some European countries have implemented more school policies that are supportive to a healthy nutrition environment than others. However, most countries with low school nutrition environment scores also host schools with supportive school environment policies, suggesting that a uniform school policy to tackle the “unhealthy” school nutrition environment has not been implemented at the same level throughout a country and may underline the need for harmonized school policies.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/11/11261/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_GB
dc.titleWHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: School Nutrition Environment and Body Mass Index in Primary Schoolsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_GB
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