An Analysis of the Human Resource Development Strategy within a Public Sector Mental Health Service Organisation / Thesis by Alison O’Donnell

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/333676
Title:
An Analysis of the Human Resource Development Strategy within a Public Sector Mental Health Service Organisation / Thesis by Alison O’Donnell
Authors:
O'Donnell, Alison
Is Part Of:
A project prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Masters Degree of Master in Management Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business College of Business and Law
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive - Dublin Mid-Leinster Region
Citation:
O'Donnell, A An Analysis of the Human Resource Development Strategy within a Public Sector Mental Health Service Organisation; Thesis. Dublin: University College Dublin, 2011.
Publisher:
University College Dublin
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/333676
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
Within modern western occupational culture the Human Resource Development (HRD) concept, as argued by Harrison (1997), should be renamed, and called - ‘employee development’ (ED), because as this study will show, employee development/training, is a process undertaken to develop the employee within a scientific management form, Redman & Wilkinson (2009), in order to achieve the strategic goals of an organisation. And because the ‘employee’, is no longer viewed as an independent holistic human resource, which was a conceptualisation belonging to the traditional paternalistic management form of the 19th century. HRD is a young discipline Katou (2009), and does not occupy the independent status it appears given through singular identification as a concept, but it is rather an input resource, Katou (2009), component of Human Resource Management (HRM). Populist knowledge of the HRM concept is limited ironically, given that the discipline is such a practised management form at many levels in every type of business entity, every day. The literature and empirical results of this study support, Redman & Wilkinson (2007), citing, Boxhall & Purcell (2000), in their view that HRM includes everything that is involved with managing an organisation’s employment relationships. The management of those relationships in modern organisations, as outlined above is purely strategic; designed to achieve the organisational objectives. The Health Service Executive (HSE), as a research site, provides for extensive example of how strategic HRM functions, to achieve organisational objectives, and asks, was its corporate governance structure purposely mal-designed to allow for the ‘democratic’, flexible management dynamic as a public sector organisation, suggested by, Niiranen (2008), by its ‘societal creators’, and to allow for the view that the decision-making structures of local government/municipalities/public sector agencies, depend greatly on the public, and the advancement of democracy, and its policy outcomes therefore, Niiranen (2008).
Keywords:
RESEARCH; HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT
Sponsors:
Health Service Executive

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Alisonen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-04T10:43:32Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-04T10:43:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.identifier.citationO'Donnell, A An Analysis of the Human Resource Development Strategy within a Public Sector Mental Health Service Organisation; Thesis. Dublin: University College Dublin, 2011.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/333676-
dc.descriptionWithin modern western occupational culture the Human Resource Development (HRD) concept, as argued by Harrison (1997), should be renamed, and called - ‘employee development’ (ED), because as this study will show, employee development/training, is a process undertaken to develop the employee within a scientific management form, Redman & Wilkinson (2009), in order to achieve the strategic goals of an organisation. And because the ‘employee’, is no longer viewed as an independent holistic human resource, which was a conceptualisation belonging to the traditional paternalistic management form of the 19th century. HRD is a young discipline Katou (2009), and does not occupy the independent status it appears given through singular identification as a concept, but it is rather an input resource, Katou (2009), component of Human Resource Management (HRM). Populist knowledge of the HRM concept is limited ironically, given that the discipline is such a practised management form at many levels in every type of business entity, every day. The literature and empirical results of this study support, Redman & Wilkinson (2007), citing, Boxhall & Purcell (2000), in their view that HRM includes everything that is involved with managing an organisation’s employment relationships. The management of those relationships in modern organisations, as outlined above is purely strategic; designed to achieve the organisational objectives. The Health Service Executive (HSE), as a research site, provides for extensive example of how strategic HRM functions, to achieve organisational objectives, and asks, was its corporate governance structure purposely mal-designed to allow for the ‘democratic’, flexible management dynamic as a public sector organisation, suggested by, Niiranen (2008), by its ‘societal creators’, and to allow for the view that the decision-making structures of local government/municipalities/public sector agencies, depend greatly on the public, and the advancement of democracy, and its policy outcomes therefore, Niiranen (2008).en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipHealth Service Executiveen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity College Dublinen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofA project prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Masters Degree of Master in Management Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business College of Business and Lawen_GB
dc.subjectRESEARCHen_GB
dc.subjectHUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of the Human Resource Development Strategy within a Public Sector Mental Health Service Organisation / Thesis by Alison O’Donnellen_GB
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive - Dublin Mid-Leinster Regionen_GB
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