Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/333014
Title:
Proteomics in uveal melanoma.
Authors:
Ramasamy, Pathma; Murphy, Conor C; Clynes, Martin; Horgan, Noel; Moriarty, Paul; Tiernan, Damien; Beatty, Stephen; Kennedy, Susan; Meleady, Paula
Affiliation:
Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland; National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland. Electronic address: Pathma.Ramasamy@dcu.ie.
Citation:
Ramasamy, P. et al., 2014. Proteomics in uveal melanoma. Experimental Eye Research, 118 (1), pp 1-12
Journal:
Experimental eye research
Issue Date:
Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/333014
DOI:
10.1016/j.exer.2013.09.005
PubMed ID:
24056206
Abstract:
Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
CANCER; EYE DISORDER
MeSH:
Humans; Melanoma; Proteomics; Tumor Markers, Biological; Uveal Neoplasms
ISSN:
1096-0007

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRamasamy, Pathmaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Conor Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClynes, Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, Noelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoriarty, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTiernan, Damienen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Stephenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Susanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeleady, Paulaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T14:58:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-21T14:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-
dc.identifier.citationRamasamy, P. et al., 2014. Proteomics in uveal melanoma. Experimental Eye Research, 118 (1), pp 1-12en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1096-0007-
dc.identifier.pmid24056206-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.exer.2013.09.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/333014-
dc.description.abstractUveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Experimental eye researchen_GB
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subjectEYE DISORDERen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMelanoma-
dc.subject.meshProteomics-
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological-
dc.subject.meshUveal Neoplasms-
dc.titleProteomics in uveal melanoma.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal College of Surgeons Ireland, Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland; National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland. Electronic address: Pathma.Ramasamy@dcu.ie.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalExperimental eye researchen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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