Long-term follow-up of women with breast cancer: rationale for policy change.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/332131
Title:
Long-term follow-up of women with breast cancer: rationale for policy change.
Authors:
McCarthy, T; Mullen, L; Murphy, H; Carey, D; Laffoy, M
Affiliation:
National Cancer Control Programme, Kings Inns House, 200 Parnell St, Dublin, 1, Ireland, triona.mccarthy@cancercontrol.ie.
Citation:
Long-term follow-up of women with breast cancer: rationale for policy change. 2014: Ir J Med Sci
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/332131
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-014-1202-4
PubMed ID:
25271102
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11845-014-1202-4/fulltext.html
Abstract:
The number of breast cancer survivors in our ageing population continues to rise. Policy makers internationally are seeking to identify alternatives to follow-up care in an acute setting.; The National Cancer Control Programme set out to develop a new policy for long-term follow-up of breast cancer survivors in Ireland.; Policy development was informed by analysis of current attendances at breast surgical clinics for routine follow-up, extraction of the necessary components of follow-up from international guidelines and focus group research with Irish patients.; Intensive follow-up investigations, other than mammography, do not confer additional survival benefit or improved quality of life. Provision of routine follow-up care of breast cancer survivors by GPs has been shown to be equivalent to follow-up by specialist clinics, in terms of clinical outcomes, patient quality of life and patient satisfaction. In Ireland, routine follow-up accounted for 15.4 % (95 % CI: 13.8-17.0 %) of clinic appointments. A third were at least 5 years post-operative. Women highlighted issues such as attachment to specialist services, importance of communication and need for clarity as to where responsibility of care lies. Reassurance, confidence in the primary care practitioner, and coordination of multiple appointments were also identified as important issues.; A significant proportion of breast cancer survivors attending hospital surgical clinics for long-term follow-up could be safely discharged at 5 years, with the hospital maintaining responsibility for annual mammography. Successful implementation will depend on informed patients, clinicians' acceptance and communication between primary and secondary care.
Item Type:
Article In Press
Language:
en
Keywords:
BREAST CANCER; WOMEN; HEALTH POLICY
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaffoy, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T11:04:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T11:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-10-01-
dc.identifier.citationLong-term follow-up of women with breast cancer: rationale for policy change. 2014: Ir J Med Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid25271102-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-014-1202-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/332131-
dc.description.abstractThe number of breast cancer survivors in our ageing population continues to rise. Policy makers internationally are seeking to identify alternatives to follow-up care in an acute setting.-
dc.description.abstractThe National Cancer Control Programme set out to develop a new policy for long-term follow-up of breast cancer survivors in Ireland.-
dc.description.abstractPolicy development was informed by analysis of current attendances at breast surgical clinics for routine follow-up, extraction of the necessary components of follow-up from international guidelines and focus group research with Irish patients.-
dc.description.abstractIntensive follow-up investigations, other than mammography, do not confer additional survival benefit or improved quality of life. Provision of routine follow-up care of breast cancer survivors by GPs has been shown to be equivalent to follow-up by specialist clinics, in terms of clinical outcomes, patient quality of life and patient satisfaction. In Ireland, routine follow-up accounted for 15.4 % (95 % CI: 13.8-17.0 %) of clinic appointments. A third were at least 5 years post-operative. Women highlighted issues such as attachment to specialist services, importance of communication and need for clarity as to where responsibility of care lies. Reassurance, confidence in the primary care practitioner, and coordination of multiple appointments were also identified as important issues.-
dc.description.abstractA significant proportion of breast cancer survivors attending hospital surgical clinics for long-term follow-up could be safely discharged at 5 years, with the hospital maintaining responsibility for annual mammography. Successful implementation will depend on informed patients, clinicians' acceptance and communication between primary and secondary care.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11845-014-1202-4/fulltext.htmlen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.subjectBREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.subjectWOMENen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen_GB
dc.titleLong-term follow-up of women with breast cancer: rationale for policy change.en_GB
dc.typeArticle In Pressen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Cancer Control Programme, Kings Inns House, 200 Parnell St, Dublin, 1, Ireland, triona.mccarthy@cancercontrol.ie.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB

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