Dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/332055
Title:
Dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data.
Authors:
Gibson, Jennifer; Booth, Richard; Davenport, John; Keogh, Karen; Owens, Tara
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, St Patrick's University Hospital, James's Street, Dublin 8, Ireland. Electronic address: jgibson@stpatsmail.com.
Citation:
Gibson J, Booth R, Davenport J et al. Dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data. Behav Res Ther. 2014, 60:8-14
Journal:
Behaviour research and therapy
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/332055
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2014.06.007
PubMed ID:
25036538
Abstract:
Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for deliberate self-harm (DSH) and emerging evidence suggests DBT skills training alone may be a useful adaptation of the treatment. DBT skills are presumed to reduce maladaptive efforts to regulate emotional distress, such as DSH, by teaching adaptive methods of emotion regulation. However, the impact of DBT skills training on DSH and emotion regulation remains unclear. This study examined the Living Through Distress (LTD) programme, a DBT-informed skills group provided in an inpatient setting. Eighty-two adults presenting with DSH or Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) were offered places in LTD, in addition to their usual care. A further 21 clients on the waiting list for LTD were recruited as a treatment-as-usual (TAU) group. DSH, anxiety, depression, and emotion regulation were assessed at baseline and either post-intervention or 6 week follow-up. Greater reductions in the frequency of DSH and improvements in some aspects of emotion regulation were associated with completion of LTD, as compared with TAU. Improvements in DSH were maintained at 3 month follow-up. This suggests providing a brief intensive DBT-informed skills group may be a useful intervention for DSH.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
SELF HARM; PSYCHOTHERAPY
Local subject classification:
DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOUR THERAPY
ISSN:
1873-622X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Richarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavenport, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Taraen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-02T11:57:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-02T11:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-
dc.identifier.citationGibson J, Booth R, Davenport J et al. Dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data. Behav Res Ther. 2014, 60:8-14en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-622X-
dc.identifier.pmid25036538-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brat.2014.06.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/332055-
dc.description.abstractDialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for deliberate self-harm (DSH) and emerging evidence suggests DBT skills training alone may be a useful adaptation of the treatment. DBT skills are presumed to reduce maladaptive efforts to regulate emotional distress, such as DSH, by teaching adaptive methods of emotion regulation. However, the impact of DBT skills training on DSH and emotion regulation remains unclear. This study examined the Living Through Distress (LTD) programme, a DBT-informed skills group provided in an inpatient setting. Eighty-two adults presenting with DSH or Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) were offered places in LTD, in addition to their usual care. A further 21 clients on the waiting list for LTD were recruited as a treatment-as-usual (TAU) group. DSH, anxiety, depression, and emotion regulation were assessed at baseline and either post-intervention or 6 week follow-up. Greater reductions in the frequency of DSH and improvements in some aspects of emotion regulation were associated with completion of LTD, as compared with TAU. Improvements in DSH were maintained at 3 month follow-up. This suggests providing a brief intensive DBT-informed skills group may be a useful intervention for DSH.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Behaviour research and therapyen_GB
dc.subjectSELF HARMen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHOTHERAPYen_GB
dc.subject.otherDIALECTICAL BEHAVIOUR THERAPYen_GB
dc.titleDialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, St Patrick's University Hospital, James's Street, Dublin 8, Ireland. Electronic address: jgibson@stpatsmail.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBehaviour research and therapyen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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