Subclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for placental abruption: evidence from a low-risk primigravid population.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/326285
Title:
Subclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for placental abruption: evidence from a low-risk primigravid population.
Authors:
Breathnach, Fionnuala M; Donnelly, Jennifer; Cooley, Sharon M; Geary, Michael; Malone, Fergal D
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Breathnach FM et al. Subclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for placental abruption: evidence from a low-risk primigravid population. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2013, 53 (6):553-60
Journal:
The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecology
Issue Date:
Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/326285
DOI:
10.1111/ajo.12131
PubMed ID:
24111733
Abstract:
Subclinical thyroid hypofunction in pregnancy has been shown to have an association with neurodevelopmental delay in the offspring. It is unclear whether obstetric factors may account for this observation.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY
Local subject classification:
HYPOTHYROIDISM
MeSH:
Abruptio Placentae; Adult; Antibodies; Asymptomatic Diseases; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gravidity; Humans; Hypothyroidism; Iodide Peroxidase; Pregnancy; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Thyroglobulin; Thyrotropin; Thyroxine; Young Adult
ISSN:
1479-828X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBreathnach, Fionnuala Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Sharon Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeary, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Fergal Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T12:02:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T12:02:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-
dc.identifier.citationBreathnach FM et al. Subclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for placental abruption: evidence from a low-risk primigravid population. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2013, 53 (6):553-60en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-828X-
dc.identifier.pmid24111733-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajo.12131-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/326285-
dc.description.abstractSubclinical thyroid hypofunction in pregnancy has been shown to have an association with neurodevelopmental delay in the offspring. It is unclear whether obstetric factors may account for this observation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecologyen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subject.meshAbruptio Placentae-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies-
dc.subject.meshAsymptomatic Diseases-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGravidity-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism-
dc.subject.meshIodide Peroxidase-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshThyroglobulin-
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin-
dc.subject.meshThyroxine-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.subject.otherHYPOTHYROIDISMen_GB
dc.titleSubclinical hypothyroidism as a risk factor for placental abruption: evidence from a low-risk primigravid population.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecologyen_GB
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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