Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/325060
Title:
Adult abdominal hernias.
Authors:
Murphy, Kevin P; O'Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M
Affiliation:
1 All authors: Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Adult abdominal hernias. 2014, 202 (6):W506-11 AJR Am J Roentgenol
Journal:
AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/325060
DOI:
10.2214/AJR.13.12071
PubMed ID:
24848843
Additional Links:
http://www.ajronline.org/doi/abs/10.2214/AJR.13.12071
Abstract:
Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient's symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Hernia, Abdominal; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Radiography, Abdominal; Tomography, X-Ray Computed
ISSN:
1546-3141

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kevin Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Owen Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Michael Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T10:06:16Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-22T10:06:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationAdult abdominal hernias. 2014, 202 (6):W506-11 AJR Am J Roentgenolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1546-3141-
dc.identifier.pmid24848843-
dc.identifier.doi10.2214/AJR.13.12071-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/325060-
dc.description.abstractEducational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient's symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajronline.org/doi/abs/10.2214/AJR.13.12071en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to AJR. American journal of roentgenologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshHernia, Abdominal-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Abdominal-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.titleAdult abdominal hernias.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 All authors: Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAJR. American journal of roentgenologyen_GB
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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