"If you can't treat HPV, why test for it?" Women's attitudes to the changing face of cervical cancer prevention: a focus group study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324944
Title:
"If you can't treat HPV, why test for it?" Women's attitudes to the changing face of cervical cancer prevention: a focus group study
Authors:
McRae, Judith; Martin, Cara; O’Leary, John; Sharp, Linda
Affiliation:
Irish Cervical Screening Research Consortium (CERVIVA)
Citation:
McCrae J et al. "If you can't treat HPV, why test for it?" Women's attitudes to the changing face of cervical cancer prevention: a focus group study. BMC Women's Health. 2014 May 06;14(1):64
Issue Date:
6-May-2014
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6874-14-64; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324944
Abstract:
Abstract Background The relationship between infection with high-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer is transforming prevention through HPV vaccination and HPV oncogenic testing. In Ireland, a national cervical cancer screening programme and HPV vaccination were recently launched; HPV testing is currently being integrated into the screening programme. Women’s views on the transformation of cervical cancer prevention have been relatively little investigated. Methods Using qualitative focus groups, we determined women’s knowledge, attitudes towards, and acceptability of cervical cancer screening, HPV oncogenic testing and vaccination of HPV. Fifty nine women, recruited through primary care in Ireland, participated in ten focus groups. A dynamic topic guide was developed from literature reviewed. Women were provided with standardised information about HPV infection, HPV testing. Discussion transcripts were analysed thematically. Results The primary themes that emerged regarding HPV infection were: knowledge, emotional response and societal influences; especially those of healthcare practitioners. Knowledge, logistics, and psychological impact were the primary themes relating to HPV testing. Women’s attitudes towards HPV testing changed during discussion as issues were explored, thus demonstrating the complexity of this issue; lack of existing treatment for HPV infection influenced women’s attitudes, attachment to existing cervical cancer screening also was a significant factor. Conclusions Women currently have a strong attachment to cytology and any changes towards HPV primary testing will need to be managed carefully. To ensure that future cervical cancer prevention strategies will be acceptable to women, sufficient thought will have to be given to information provision and education. We identified the importance to women of healthcare practitioners’ opinions regarding HPV. Appropriate and timely information on HPV will be crucial in order to minimise possible psychological effects women may have.
Language:
en
Keywords:
CERVICAL CANCER; SCREENING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcRae, Judithen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Caraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Leary, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Lindaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-18T11:47:33Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-18T11:47:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-06-
dc.identifier.citationMcCrae J et al. "If you can't treat HPV, why test for it?" Women's attitudes to the changing face of cervical cancer prevention: a focus group study. BMC Women's Health. 2014 May 06;14(1):64en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6874-14-64-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324944-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The relationship between infection with high-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer is transforming prevention through HPV vaccination and HPV oncogenic testing. In Ireland, a national cervical cancer screening programme and HPV vaccination were recently launched; HPV testing is currently being integrated into the screening programme. Women’s views on the transformation of cervical cancer prevention have been relatively little investigated. Methods Using qualitative focus groups, we determined women’s knowledge, attitudes towards, and acceptability of cervical cancer screening, HPV oncogenic testing and vaccination of HPV. Fifty nine women, recruited through primary care in Ireland, participated in ten focus groups. A dynamic topic guide was developed from literature reviewed. Women were provided with standardised information about HPV infection, HPV testing. Discussion transcripts were analysed thematically. Results The primary themes that emerged regarding HPV infection were: knowledge, emotional response and societal influences; especially those of healthcare practitioners. Knowledge, logistics, and psychological impact were the primary themes relating to HPV testing. Women’s attitudes towards HPV testing changed during discussion as issues were explored, thus demonstrating the complexity of this issue; lack of existing treatment for HPV infection influenced women’s attitudes, attachment to existing cervical cancer screening also was a significant factor. Conclusions Women currently have a strong attachment to cytology and any changes towards HPV primary testing will need to be managed carefully. To ensure that future cervical cancer prevention strategies will be acceptable to women, sufficient thought will have to be given to information provision and education. We identified the importance to women of healthcare practitioners’ opinions regarding HPV. Appropriate and timely information on HPV will be crucial in order to minimise possible psychological effects women may have.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCERVICAL CANCERen_GB
dc.subjectSCREENINGen_GB
dc.title"If you can't treat HPV, why test for it?" Women's attitudes to the changing face of cervical cancer prevention: a focus group studyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentIrish Cervical Screening Research Consortium (CERVIVA)en_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderJudith McRae et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2014-08-18T10:53:27Z-
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