Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324943
Title:
Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.
Authors:
Davis, Niall F; Kheradmand, F; Creagh, T
Affiliation:
Department of Urology, Beaumont Hospital, Co. Dublin, Ireland. nialldavis2001@yahoo.com
Citation:
Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents. 2013, 24 (6):913-9 Int Urogynecol J
Journal:
International urogynecology journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324943
DOI:
10.1007/s00192-012-2011-9
PubMed ID:
23224022
Abstract:
Injectable urethral bulking agents composed of synthetic and biological biomaterials are minimally invasive treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The development of an ideal urethral bulking agent remains challenging because of clinical concerns over biocompatibility and durability. Herein, the mechanical and biological features of injectable urethral biomaterials are investigated, with particular emphasis on their future potential as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. A literature search for English language publications using the two online databases was performed. Keywords included "stress urinary incontinence", "urethral bulking agent" and "injectable biomaterial". A total of 98 articles were analysed, of which 45 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. Injectable biomaterials are associated with a lower cure rate and fewer postoperative complications than open surgery for SUI. They are frequently reserved as secondary treatment options for patients unwilling or medically unfit to undergo surgery. Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine collagen remains the most commonly injected biomaterial and has a cure rate of up to 53 %. Important clinical features of an injectable biomaterial are durability, biocompatibility and ease of administration, but achieving these requirements is challenging. In carefully selected patients, injectable biomaterials are feasible alternatives to open surgical procedures as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. In future, higher cure rates may be feasible as researchers investigate alternative biomaterials and more targeted injection techniques for treating SUI.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
URINARY INCONTINENCE
Local subject classification:
STRESS URNIARY INCONTINENCE; BIOMATERIAL
MeSH:
Biocompatible Materials; Biomechanical Phenomena; Collagen; Humans; Injections; Treatment Outcome; Urethra; Urinary Incontinence, Stress
ISSN:
1433-3023

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Niall Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKheradmand, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCreagh, Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-18T11:46:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-18T11:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-
dc.identifier.citationInjectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents. 2013, 24 (6):913-9 Int Urogynecol Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1433-3023-
dc.identifier.pmid23224022-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00192-012-2011-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324943-
dc.description.abstractInjectable urethral bulking agents composed of synthetic and biological biomaterials are minimally invasive treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The development of an ideal urethral bulking agent remains challenging because of clinical concerns over biocompatibility and durability. Herein, the mechanical and biological features of injectable urethral biomaterials are investigated, with particular emphasis on their future potential as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. A literature search for English language publications using the two online databases was performed. Keywords included "stress urinary incontinence", "urethral bulking agent" and "injectable biomaterial". A total of 98 articles were analysed, of which 45 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. Injectable biomaterials are associated with a lower cure rate and fewer postoperative complications than open surgery for SUI. They are frequently reserved as secondary treatment options for patients unwilling or medically unfit to undergo surgery. Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine collagen remains the most commonly injected biomaterial and has a cure rate of up to 53 %. Important clinical features of an injectable biomaterial are durability, biocompatibility and ease of administration, but achieving these requirements is challenging. In carefully selected patients, injectable biomaterials are feasible alternatives to open surgical procedures as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. In future, higher cure rates may be feasible as researchers investigate alternative biomaterials and more targeted injection techniques for treating SUI.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International urogynecology journalen_GB
dc.subjectURINARY INCONTINENCEen_GB
dc.subject.meshBiocompatible Materials-
dc.subject.meshBiomechanical Phenomena-
dc.subject.meshCollagen-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInjections-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.subject.meshUrethra-
dc.subject.meshUrinary Incontinence, Stress-
dc.subject.otherSTRESS URNIARY INCONTINENCEen_GB
dc.subject.otherBIOMATERIALen_GB
dc.titleInjectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, Beaumont Hospital, Co. Dublin, Ireland. nialldavis2001@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational urogynecology journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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