Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324837
Title:
Cancer trends no 20. non-melanoma skin cancer
Authors:
National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI), The
Citation:
National Cancer Registry Ireland.Cancer trends no 20. non-melanoma skin cancer. Dublin: National Cancer Registry Ireland; 2013. 3p.
Publisher:
National Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI)
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324837
Additional Links:
http://www.ncri.ie/
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Between 1994 and 2011, an average of 6,899 cases of invasive skin cancer was diagnosed per year in Ireland. Malignant melanoma accounted for just over 8% of this number; the vast bulk of all invasive skin cancers being non-melanomatous subtypes, of which over 6,300 were diagnosed each year (Table 1). Over 95% of these “nonmelanoma” skin cancers were histologically diagnosed and almost all were either basal (68% approximately) or squamous (30%) cell carcinomas (BCC and SCC respectively). The remaining nonmelanoma subtypes were all very rare by comparison and included Kaposi sarcoma and cutaneous lymphomas, principally mycosis fungoides and T-cell lymphomas. The remainder of this report deals with BCC and SCC only.
Keywords:
SKIN CANCER; DATA ANALYSIS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI), Theen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T13:20:59Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-15T13:20:59Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationNational Cancer Registry Ireland.Cancer trends no 20. non-melanoma skin cancer. Dublin: National Cancer Registry Ireland; 2013. 3p.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324837-
dc.descriptionBetween 1994 and 2011, an average of 6,899 cases of invasive skin cancer was diagnosed per year in Ireland. Malignant melanoma accounted for just over 8% of this number; the vast bulk of all invasive skin cancers being non-melanomatous subtypes, of which over 6,300 were diagnosed each year (Table 1). Over 95% of these “nonmelanoma” skin cancers were histologically diagnosed and almost all were either basal (68% approximately) or squamous (30%) cell carcinomas (BCC and SCC respectively). The remaining nonmelanoma subtypes were all very rare by comparison and included Kaposi sarcoma and cutaneous lymphomas, principally mycosis fungoides and T-cell lymphomas. The remainder of this report deals with BCC and SCC only.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Cancer Registry Ireland (NCRI)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncri.ie/en_GB
dc.subjectSKIN CANCERen_GB
dc.subjectDATA ANALYSISen_GB
dc.titleCancer trends no 20. non-melanoma skin canceren_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.