Pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a general respiratory population

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324759
Title:
Pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a general respiratory population
Authors:
Chong, SG; Kent, BD; Fitzgerald, S; McDonnell, TJ
Citation:
Chong SG et al. Pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a general respiratory population. IMJ. 2014 107(7)
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324759
Abstract:
The prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) appears to be increasing. Much of the experience in the literature about this emerging organism comes from specialised units or populations such as cystic fibrosis patients. We, therefore, aim to evaluate the experience in a general respiratory population of dealing with patients with positive culture of NTM. We did a retrospective review of medical notes of general respiratory patients from whom NTM were isolated from January 2007 to July 2012. Cystic fibrosis patients were excluded. We reviewed 37 patientsâ (19 males, 18 females) medical records. A total of 73 positive cultures were reviewed. 28 isolates were from sputum samples alone, 34 isolates were from bronchoalveolar lavage alone and 11 isolates were from a combination of sputum and bronchoalveor lavage (11 isolates). We found that Mycobacterium avium was the most frequently isolated Mycobacterium in our laboratory with 22 (60%) patients had Mycobacterium avium in their pulmonary cultures. Interestingly, Mycobacterium gordonae and mycobacterium intracellulare were the second commonest mycobacterium (4, 11%) cultured. We noted 2 (5%), cases of Mycobacterium szulgai, 2 (5%) cases of Mycobacterium chelonae and 2 (5%) cases of Mycobacterium abscessus. There was 1(3%) case of Mycobacterium malmoense. There is prevalence of NTM in male COPD patients (7, 89%) and female bronchiectasis (10, 77%) patients. Of our 8 COPD patients, 6 (75%) were on inhaled corticosteroids while 2 (25%) were not. 9 (24%) patients were smokers, 11 (30%) were ex-smokers, 14 (38%) were non-smokers and the smoking status of the remaining 3 (8%) was unknown. Of the 37 patients, only 6 (16%) received treatment. However, 2 patients stopped their treatment due to treatment toxicity. We concluded that the isolation of NTM is not uncommon. Defining NTM disease is difficult and deciding which patient to be treated needs careful evaluation as treatment can potentially be very toxic.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
RESPIRATORY DISORDER
Local subject classification:
INFECTION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChong, SGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKent, BDen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, TJen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-14T11:53:55Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-14T11:53:55Z-
dc.date.issued2014-07-
dc.identifier.citationChong SG et al. Pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a general respiratory population. IMJ. 2014 107(7)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324759-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) appears to be increasing. Much of the experience in the literature about this emerging organism comes from specialised units or populations such as cystic fibrosis patients. We, therefore, aim to evaluate the experience in a general respiratory population of dealing with patients with positive culture of NTM. We did a retrospective review of medical notes of general respiratory patients from whom NTM were isolated from January 2007 to July 2012. Cystic fibrosis patients were excluded. We reviewed 37 patientsâ (19 males, 18 females) medical records. A total of 73 positive cultures were reviewed. 28 isolates were from sputum samples alone, 34 isolates were from bronchoalveolar lavage alone and 11 isolates were from a combination of sputum and bronchoalveor lavage (11 isolates). We found that Mycobacterium avium was the most frequently isolated Mycobacterium in our laboratory with 22 (60%) patients had Mycobacterium avium in their pulmonary cultures. Interestingly, Mycobacterium gordonae and mycobacterium intracellulare were the second commonest mycobacterium (4, 11%) cultured. We noted 2 (5%), cases of Mycobacterium szulgai, 2 (5%) cases of Mycobacterium chelonae and 2 (5%) cases of Mycobacterium abscessus. There was 1(3%) case of Mycobacterium malmoense. There is prevalence of NTM in male COPD patients (7, 89%) and female bronchiectasis (10, 77%) patients. Of our 8 COPD patients, 6 (75%) were on inhaled corticosteroids while 2 (25%) were not. 9 (24%) patients were smokers, 11 (30%) were ex-smokers, 14 (38%) were non-smokers and the smoking status of the remaining 3 (8%) was unknown. Of the 37 patients, only 6 (16%) received treatment. However, 2 patients stopped their treatment due to treatment toxicity. We concluded that the isolation of NTM is not uncommon. Defining NTM disease is difficult and deciding which patient to be treated needs careful evaluation as treatment can potentially be very toxic.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectRESPIRATORY DISORDERen_GB
dc.subject.otherINFECTIONen_GB
dc.titlePulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a general respiratory populationen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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