Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324642
Title:
Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.
Authors:
O'Donoghue, Brian; Roche, Eric; Ranieri, Veronica F; Shannon, Stephen; Crummey, Ciaran; Murray, Johanna; Smith, Damian G; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Lyne, John P; Madigan, Kevin; Feeney, Larkin
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, Newtownpark Ave., Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. briannoelodonoghue@gmail.com
Citation:
O'Donoghue B et al. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians. Psychiatr Serv. 2013, 64 (5):416-22, 416.e1-3
Journal:
Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
Issue Date:
1-May-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324642
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ps.001912012
PubMed ID:
23318707
Additional Links:
http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=1557664
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES; HOSPITAL
Local subject classification:
HOSPITAL ADMISSION
MeSH:
Adult; Attitude to Health; Coercion; Commitment of Mentally Ill; Female; Hospital Units; Hospitalization; Hospitals, Psychiatric; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Patient Satisfaction; Peer Group; Perception; Physician-Patient Relations; Psychiatric Department, Hospital; Research Personnel
ISSN:
1557-9700
Sponsors:
The project was partially funded by a grant from the Mental Health Commission in Ireland. Support was also provided by the Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, which employed a service user–researcher part time.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Ericen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRanieri, Veronica Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Stephenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrummey, Ciaranen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Johannaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Damian Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Loughlin, Kieranen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLyne, John Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMadigan, Kevinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeeney, Larkinen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-11T12:07:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-11T12:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationO'Donoghue B et al. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians. Psychiatr Serv. 2013, 64 (5):416-22, 416.e1-3en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1557-9700-
dc.identifier.pmid23318707-
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ps.001912012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324642-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.en_GB
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.-
dc.description.sponsorshipThe project was partially funded by a grant from the Mental Health Commission in Ireland. Support was also provided by the Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, which employed a service user–researcher part time.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ps.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=1557664en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)en_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health-
dc.subject.meshCoercion-
dc.subject.meshCommitment of Mentally Ill-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospital Units-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Psychiatric-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topic-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshPeer Group-
dc.subject.meshPerception-
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Department, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshResearch Personnel-
dc.subject.otherHOSPITAL ADMISSIONen_GB
dc.titleService users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, Newtownpark Ave., Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. briannoelodonoghue@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalPsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)en_GB

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