Autobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324625
Title:
Autobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap.
Authors:
Mohan, H M; Winter, D C
Citation:
Mohan HM, Winter DC. Autobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap. Updates Surg. 2013, 65 (4):333-5
Journal:
Updates in surgery
Issue Date:
Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324625
DOI:
10.1007/s13304-013-0230-3
PubMed ID:
23980021
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13304-013-0230-3
Abstract:
Anastomotic leakage is a common and dreaded complication of colorectal surgery. Many different approaches have been tried to attempt to reduce leakage and associated morbidity. The concept of reinforcement of an anastomosis by buttressing is well established. Techniques described include using sutures, native omentum, animal or synthetic material. We report a technique for buttressing using a mesenteric flap to envelope the anastomosis. The primary rationale is to reduce clinical sequelae of anastomotic leakage by promoting local containment, as well as providing a scaffold for healing. Using autologous tissue provides a safe, time-efficient and cost-effective buttress without the risks of infection or reaction associated with foreign material. A mesenteric flap is particularly useful in patients in whom omentum is not available due to previous surgery, or to fill the dead space posterior to a low anastomosis within the pelvis.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
SURGERY
Local subject classification:
SURGERY, COLORECTAL
MeSH:
Anastomosis, Surgical; Anastomotic Leak; Colon; Electrocoagulation; Humans; Mesentery; Rectum; Surgical Flaps; Suture Techniques
ISSN:
2038-131X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMohan, H Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinter, D Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-11T09:37:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-11T09:37:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-
dc.identifier.citationMohan HM, Winter DC. Autobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap. Updates Surg. 2013, 65 (4):333-5en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2038-131X-
dc.identifier.pmid23980021-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13304-013-0230-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324625-
dc.description.abstractAnastomotic leakage is a common and dreaded complication of colorectal surgery. Many different approaches have been tried to attempt to reduce leakage and associated morbidity. The concept of reinforcement of an anastomosis by buttressing is well established. Techniques described include using sutures, native omentum, animal or synthetic material. We report a technique for buttressing using a mesenteric flap to envelope the anastomosis. The primary rationale is to reduce clinical sequelae of anastomotic leakage by promoting local containment, as well as providing a scaffold for healing. Using autologous tissue provides a safe, time-efficient and cost-effective buttress without the risks of infection or reaction associated with foreign material. A mesenteric flap is particularly useful in patients in whom omentum is not available due to previous surgery, or to fill the dead space posterior to a low anastomosis within the pelvis.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13304-013-0230-3en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Updates in surgeryen_GB
dc.subjectSURGERYen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnastomosis, Surgical-
dc.subject.meshAnastomotic Leak-
dc.subject.meshColon-
dc.subject.meshElectrocoagulation-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMesentery-
dc.subject.meshRectum-
dc.subject.meshSurgical Flaps-
dc.subject.meshSuture Techniques-
dc.subject.otherSURGERY, COLORECTALen_GB
dc.titleAutobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalUpdates in surgeryen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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