Melanoma in primary care. The role of the general practitioner.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324489
Title:
Melanoma in primary care. The role of the general practitioner.
Authors:
Buckley, D; McMonagle, C
Affiliation:
The Ashe Street Clinic, Tralee, Co Kerry, Ireland, info@asctralee.com.
Citation:
Buckley D, McMonagle C. Melanoma in primary care: the role of the general practitioner. 2014, 183 (3):363-8 Ir J Med Sci
Publisher:
Irish journal of medical science
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324489
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-013-1021-z
PubMed ID:
24091614
Abstract:
The British Association of Dermatologists and the National Cancer Control Programme in Ireland discourage all GPs from biopsying any lesions suspicious of melanoma.; The aim of this study was to assess whether or not it is safe and practical for a general practitioner with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery to assess suspicious skin lesions and treat low risk melanomas.; The outcome of 56 new melanomas (31 invasive, 7 in situ and 18 lentigo maligna) in 53 patients, managed by a GP with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery, over a 20 year period, was examined.; Forty-eight (86 %) of the melanomas had the initial biopsy carried out in primary care. The average time from presentation to the practice to the date of the biopsy was 8 days for the in situ and invasive melanomas and 17 days for the lentigo malignas. Twenty-eight (50 %) of the melanomas were considered low risk (in situ, invasive <1 mm deep or lentigo maligna) and were treated successfully in primary care according to the Australian and New Zealand guidelines, without any surgical complications.; GPs with extra training in skin cancer and skin surgery could assess most suspicious skin lesions with dermoscopy and if necessary, biopsy most of these lesions in primary care. This would lead to a quicker diagnosis, more rapid pathway to definitive treatment, lower cost and more convenience to the patient, especially for those living in rural areas.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: The British Association of Dermatologists and the National Cancer Control Programme in Ireland discourage all GPs from biopsying any lesions suspicious of melanoma. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess whether or not it is safe and practical for a general practitioner with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery to assess suspicious skin lesions and treat low risk melanomas. METHOD: The outcome of 56 new melanomas (31 invasive, 7 in situ and 18 lentigo maligna) in 53 patients, managed by a GP with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery, over a 20 year period, was examined. RESULTS: Forty-eight (86 %) of the melanomas had the initial biopsy carried out in primary care. The average time from presentation to the practice to the date of the biopsy was 8 days for the in situ and invasive melanomas and 17 days for the lentigo malignas. Twenty-eight (50 %) of the melanomas were considered low risk (in situ, invasive <1 mm deep or lentigo maligna) and were treated successfully in primary care according to the Australian and New Zealand guidelines, without any surgical complications. CONCLUSION: GPs with extra training in skin cancer and skin surgery could assess most suspicious skin lesions with dermoscopy and if necessary, biopsy most of these lesions in primary care. This would lead to a quicker diagnosis, more rapid pathway to definitive treatment, lower cost and more convenience to the patient, especially for those living in rural areas.
Keywords:
SKIN CANCER
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMonagle, Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-08T11:20:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-08T11:20:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-
dc.identifier.citationBuckley D, McMonagle C. Melanoma in primary care: the role of the general practitioner. 2014, 183 (3):363-8 Ir J Med Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid24091614-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-013-1021-z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324489-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: The British Association of Dermatologists and the National Cancer Control Programme in Ireland discourage all GPs from biopsying any lesions suspicious of melanoma. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess whether or not it is safe and practical for a general practitioner with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery to assess suspicious skin lesions and treat low risk melanomas. METHOD: The outcome of 56 new melanomas (31 invasive, 7 in situ and 18 lentigo maligna) in 53 patients, managed by a GP with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery, over a 20 year period, was examined. RESULTS: Forty-eight (86 %) of the melanomas had the initial biopsy carried out in primary care. The average time from presentation to the practice to the date of the biopsy was 8 days for the in situ and invasive melanomas and 17 days for the lentigo malignas. Twenty-eight (50 %) of the melanomas were considered low risk (in situ, invasive <1 mm deep or lentigo maligna) and were treated successfully in primary care according to the Australian and New Zealand guidelines, without any surgical complications. CONCLUSION: GPs with extra training in skin cancer and skin surgery could assess most suspicious skin lesions with dermoscopy and if necessary, biopsy most of these lesions in primary care. This would lead to a quicker diagnosis, more rapid pathway to definitive treatment, lower cost and more convenience to the patient, especially for those living in rural areas.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe British Association of Dermatologists and the National Cancer Control Programme in Ireland discourage all GPs from biopsying any lesions suspicious of melanoma.-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to assess whether or not it is safe and practical for a general practitioner with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery to assess suspicious skin lesions and treat low risk melanomas.-
dc.description.abstractThe outcome of 56 new melanomas (31 invasive, 7 in situ and 18 lentigo maligna) in 53 patients, managed by a GP with extra training in dermatology and skin surgery, over a 20 year period, was examined.-
dc.description.abstractForty-eight (86 %) of the melanomas had the initial biopsy carried out in primary care. The average time from presentation to the practice to the date of the biopsy was 8 days for the in situ and invasive melanomas and 17 days for the lentigo malignas. Twenty-eight (50 %) of the melanomas were considered low risk (in situ, invasive <1 mm deep or lentigo maligna) and were treated successfully in primary care according to the Australian and New Zealand guidelines, without any surgical complications.-
dc.description.abstractGPs with extra training in skin cancer and skin surgery could assess most suspicious skin lesions with dermoscopy and if necessary, biopsy most of these lesions in primary care. This would lead to a quicker diagnosis, more rapid pathway to definitive treatment, lower cost and more convenience to the patient, especially for those living in rural areas.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.subjectSKIN CANCERen_GB
dc.titleMelanoma in primary care. The role of the general practitioner.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Ashe Street Clinic, Tralee, Co Kerry, Ireland, info@asctralee.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB

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