Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324300
Title:
National survey of MRSA: Ireland, 1995.
Authors:
Johnson, Z; Fitzpatrick, P; Hayes, C; Sayers, G; Pelly, H; McDonnell, B; Thornton, L; Buttimer, J
Affiliation:
Health Information Unit, Eastern Health Board, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Johnson Z et al. National survey of MRSA: Ireland, 1995. J. Hosp. Infect. 1997, 35 (3):175-84
Journal:
The Journal of hospital infection
Issue Date:
Mar-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324300
PubMed ID:
9093916
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9093916
Abstract:
The objective of this survey was to obtain an indication of the size of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) problem in Ireland prior to introducing national MRSA control guidelines. A survey of all microbiology laboratories in Ireland was carried out over two weeks in Spring 1995. For patients from whom MRSA was isolated during the study period standard demographic and clinical data were requested and period prevalence/1000 discharges was calculated. All 45 microbiology laboratories surveyed responded. MRSA was isolated from 448 patients during the two-week period. The period prevalence of MRSA was 16.5/1000 discharges. Males aged > or = 65 had the highest rate (50/1000 discharges). Half of all isolates were from patients in surgical or medical wards, but 4% were from community-based sources such as GPs, nursing homes and hospices. Thirty-two percent of MRSA patients were infected rather than colonized. MRSA is clearly a significant problem in Ireland. While it is largely a hospital problem at present, the increasing trend towards day procedures and shorter hospital stay means that infection will increase in the community.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The objective of this survey was to obtain an indication of the size of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) problem in Ireland prior to introducing national MRSA control guidelines. A survey of all microbiology laboratories in Ireland was carried out over two weeks in Spring 1995. For patients from whom MRSA was isolated during the study period standard demographic and clinical data were requested and period prevalence/1000 discharges was calculated. All 45 microbiology laboratories surveyed responded. MRSA was isolated from 448 patients during the two-week period. The period prevalence of MRSA was 16.5/1000 discharges. Males aged > or = 65 had the highest rate (50/1000 discharges). Half of all isolates were from patients in surgical or medical wards, but 4% were from community-based sources such as GPs, nursing homes and hospices. Thirty-two percent of MRSA patients were infected rather than colonized. MRSA is clearly a significant problem in Ireland. While it is largely a hospital problem at present, the increasing trend towards day procedures and shorter hospital stay means that infection will increase in the community.
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL; STATISTICAL DATA
Local subject classification:
METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS; HEALTHCARE-ACQUIRED INFECTION
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Child; Child, Preschool; Cross Infection; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Infection Control; Ireland; Male; Methicillin Resistance; Middle Aged; Patient Discharge; Population Surveillance; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Prevalence; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus
ISSN:
0195-6701

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSayers, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPelly, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorButtimer, Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-06T10:41:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-06T10:41:09Z-
dc.date.issued1997-03-
dc.identifier.citationJohnson Z et al. National survey of MRSA: Ireland, 1995. J. Hosp. Infect. 1997, 35 (3):175-84en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0195-6701-
dc.identifier.pmid9093916-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324300-
dc.descriptionThe objective of this survey was to obtain an indication of the size of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) problem in Ireland prior to introducing national MRSA control guidelines. A survey of all microbiology laboratories in Ireland was carried out over two weeks in Spring 1995. For patients from whom MRSA was isolated during the study period standard demographic and clinical data were requested and period prevalence/1000 discharges was calculated. All 45 microbiology laboratories surveyed responded. MRSA was isolated from 448 patients during the two-week period. The period prevalence of MRSA was 16.5/1000 discharges. Males aged > or = 65 had the highest rate (50/1000 discharges). Half of all isolates were from patients in surgical or medical wards, but 4% were from community-based sources such as GPs, nursing homes and hospices. Thirty-two percent of MRSA patients were infected rather than colonized. MRSA is clearly a significant problem in Ireland. While it is largely a hospital problem at present, the increasing trend towards day procedures and shorter hospital stay means that infection will increase in the community.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this survey was to obtain an indication of the size of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) problem in Ireland prior to introducing national MRSA control guidelines. A survey of all microbiology laboratories in Ireland was carried out over two weeks in Spring 1995. For patients from whom MRSA was isolated during the study period standard demographic and clinical data were requested and period prevalence/1000 discharges was calculated. All 45 microbiology laboratories surveyed responded. MRSA was isolated from 448 patients during the two-week period. The period prevalence of MRSA was 16.5/1000 discharges. Males aged > or = 65 had the highest rate (50/1000 discharges). Half of all isolates were from patients in surgical or medical wards, but 4% were from community-based sources such as GPs, nursing homes and hospices. Thirty-two percent of MRSA patients were infected rather than colonized. MRSA is clearly a significant problem in Ireland. While it is largely a hospital problem at present, the increasing trend towards day procedures and shorter hospital stay means that infection will increase in the community.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9093916en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of hospital infectionen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectSTATISTICAL DATAen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCross Infection-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInfection Control-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMethicillin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPatient Discharge-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance-
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines as Topic-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infections-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcus aureus-
dc.subject.otherMETHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUSen_GB
dc.subject.otherHEALTHCARE-ACQUIRED INFECTIONen_GB
dc.titleNational survey of MRSA: Ireland, 1995.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Information Unit, Eastern Health Board, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of hospital infectionen_GB

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