MRSA bacteraemia: North/South study of MRSA in Ireland 1999.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324292
Title:
MRSA bacteraemia: North/South study of MRSA in Ireland 1999.
Authors:
Mc Donald, P; Mitchell, E; Johnson, H; Rossney, A; Humphreys, H; Glynn, G; Burd, M; Doyle, D; Mc Donnell, R
Affiliation:
Health Information Unit, Department of Public Health, Eastern Regional Health Authority, Dublin, Ireland. patriciamcdonald@eircom.net
Citation:
McDonald P et al. MRSA bacteraemia: North/South study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. J. Hosp. Infect. 2002, 52 (4):288-91
Journal:
The Journal of hospital infection
Issue Date:
Dec-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324292
PubMed ID:
12473474
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473474
Abstract:
Retrospective aggregate data on all Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from blood cultures during 1998 were collected in both jurisdictions on the island of Ireland, Northern Ireland (North) and the Republic of Ireland (South), as part of the North/South Study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to gather the data, and all diagnostic microbiology laboratories in the North and 98% of laboratories in the South participated. S. aureus bacteraemia occurred at rates of 20.4 per 100,000 population in the North and 24.5 per 100,000 in the South (missing data from one laboratory). In the North, 22% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 25% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA (some patients had more than one isolate). In the South, 31% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had MRSA and 36% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA. There was a marked variation in rates between different regions. The percentage of patients with blood cultures positive for S. aureus that had MRSA was considerably lower in the North (22%) than in the South (31%), and in both jurisdictions was lower than that found in England and Wales in 1999 (37%). It is recommended that data on S. aureus bacteraemia and methicillin-resistance rates (already available in many laboratories) are gathered at regional and national level for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Retrospective aggregate data on all Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from blood cultures during 1998 were collected in both jurisdictions on the island of Ireland, Northern Ireland (North) and the Republic of Ireland (South), as part of the North/South Study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to gather the data, and all diagnostic microbiology laboratories in the North and 98% of laboratories in the South participated. S. aureus bacteraemia occurred at rates of 20.4 per 100,000 population in the North and 24.5 per 100,000 in the South (missing data from one laboratory). In the North, 22% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 25% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA (some patients had more than one isolate). In the South, 31% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had MRSA and 36% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA. There was a marked variation in rates between different regions. The percentage of patients with blood cultures positive for S. aureus that had MRSA was considerably lower in the North (22%) than in the South (31%), and in both jurisdictions was lower than that found in England and Wales in 1999 (37%). It is recommended that data on S. aureus bacteraemia and methicillin-resistance rates (already available in many laboratories) are gathered at regional and national level for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL
Local subject classification:
HEALTHCARE-ACQUIRED INFECTION; METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS
MeSH:
Bacteremia; Cross Infection; Data Collection; England; Humans; Incidence; Infection Control; Ireland; Laboratories; Methicillin Resistance; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Northern Ireland; Population Surveillance; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Residence Characteristics; Retrospective Studies; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Wales
ISSN:
0195-6701

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMc Donald, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRossney, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlynn, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurd, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMc Donnell, Ren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-06T08:58:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-06T08:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2002-12-
dc.identifier.citationMcDonald P et al. MRSA bacteraemia: North/South study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. J. Hosp. Infect. 2002, 52 (4):288-91en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0195-6701-
dc.identifier.pmid12473474-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324292-
dc.descriptionRetrospective aggregate data on all Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from blood cultures during 1998 were collected in both jurisdictions on the island of Ireland, Northern Ireland (North) and the Republic of Ireland (South), as part of the North/South Study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to gather the data, and all diagnostic microbiology laboratories in the North and 98% of laboratories in the South participated. S. aureus bacteraemia occurred at rates of 20.4 per 100,000 population in the North and 24.5 per 100,000 in the South (missing data from one laboratory). In the North, 22% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 25% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA (some patients had more than one isolate). In the South, 31% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had MRSA and 36% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA. There was a marked variation in rates between different regions. The percentage of patients with blood cultures positive for S. aureus that had MRSA was considerably lower in the North (22%) than in the South (31%), and in both jurisdictions was lower than that found in England and Wales in 1999 (37%). It is recommended that data on S. aureus bacteraemia and methicillin-resistance rates (already available in many laboratories) are gathered at regional and national level for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.en_GB
dc.description.abstractRetrospective aggregate data on all Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from blood cultures during 1998 were collected in both jurisdictions on the island of Ireland, Northern Ireland (North) and the Republic of Ireland (South), as part of the North/South Study of MRSA in Ireland 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to gather the data, and all diagnostic microbiology laboratories in the North and 98% of laboratories in the South participated. S. aureus bacteraemia occurred at rates of 20.4 per 100,000 population in the North and 24.5 per 100,000 in the South (missing data from one laboratory). In the North, 22% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 25% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA (some patients had more than one isolate). In the South, 31% of patients who had blood cultures positive for S. aureus had MRSA and 36% of S. aureus isolates were MRSA. There was a marked variation in rates between different regions. The percentage of patients with blood cultures positive for S. aureus that had MRSA was considerably lower in the North (22%) than in the South (31%), and in both jurisdictions was lower than that found in England and Wales in 1999 (37%). It is recommended that data on S. aureus bacteraemia and methicillin-resistance rates (already available in many laboratories) are gathered at regional and national level for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473474en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of hospital infectionen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacteremia-
dc.subject.meshCross Infection-
dc.subject.meshData Collection-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshInfection Control-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLaboratories-
dc.subject.meshMethicillin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Tests-
dc.subject.meshNorthern Ireland-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infections-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcus aureus-
dc.subject.meshWales-
dc.subject.otherHEALTHCARE-ACQUIRED INFECTIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherMETHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUSen_GB
dc.titleMRSA bacteraemia: North/South study of MRSA in Ireland 1999.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Information Unit, Department of Public Health, Eastern Regional Health Authority, Dublin, Ireland. patriciamcdonald@eircom.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of hospital infectionen_GB

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