Men's health and wellbeing programme: evaluation report

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324285
Title:
Men's health and wellbeing programme: evaluation report
Authors:
Richardson, Noel; Centre for Men's Health, Institute of Technology Carlow
Citation:
Richardson N. Men's health and wellbeing programme: evaluation report. Dublin: The Larkin Unemployed Centre; 2010 50p.
Publisher:
The Larkin Unemployed Centre
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324285
Additional Links:
http://www.larkinctr.com/education/mens-health.php
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Men's Health and Wellbeing Programme (MHWP) was developed by the Larkin Centre in partnership with Glasgow Celtic Football Club, the Heath Service Executive and Pfizer Healthcare Ireland. The Programme which was based in Ballybough also reached out to include participants living in Dublin's North Inner City. This area is marked as a socially disadvantaged area within Dublin city, and, despite significant improvements generally, in areas such as, education and increased employment in' Dublin's inner city over the past twenty years (Trutz Haase,' 2008), the North Inner City neighbourhood of Ballybough is an area that still suffers multiple social disadvantage. For example, almost one third (29%) of the population within the electoral district (ED) of Ballybough has completed primary education only (Trutz Haase, 2008). The highest rate of unemployment within Dublin's Inner City is within the electoral district of Ballybough (23.3% males, 19.0% females; Trutz Haase, 2008). This is almost double the current national unemployment rate (CSO, 2010). This is significant, as recent evidence indicates that, relative to those living in rural areas, males in urban areas are' more likely to remain welfare dependant after being unemployed for 12 months or more (O'Connell et al, 2009). Previous studies have identified a causal relationship between unemployment and ill health that appears to be particularly pronounced among men (Mathers and Schofield, 2008). Unemployment is associated with an increased risk of total mortality and affects both psychological and physiological risk factors for ill health (Wadsworth et aI, 1999).
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; SOCIAL EXCLUSION; HEALTH STATUS
Sponsors:
The Larkin Unemployed Centre, Glasgow Celtic Football Club, Heath Service Executive, Pfizer Healthcare Ireland

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Noelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCentre for Men's Health, Institute of Technology Carlowen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-05T16:00:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-05T16:00:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationRichardson N. Men's health and wellbeing programme: evaluation report. Dublin: The Larkin Unemployed Centre; 2010 50p.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324285-
dc.descriptionThe Men's Health and Wellbeing Programme (MHWP) was developed by the Larkin Centre in partnership with Glasgow Celtic Football Club, the Heath Service Executive and Pfizer Healthcare Ireland. The Programme which was based in Ballybough also reached out to include participants living in Dublin's North Inner City. This area is marked as a socially disadvantaged area within Dublin city, and, despite significant improvements generally, in areas such as, education and increased employment in' Dublin's inner city over the past twenty years (Trutz Haase,' 2008), the North Inner City neighbourhood of Ballybough is an area that still suffers multiple social disadvantage. For example, almost one third (29%) of the population within the electoral district (ED) of Ballybough has completed primary education only (Trutz Haase, 2008). The highest rate of unemployment within Dublin's Inner City is within the electoral district of Ballybough (23.3% males, 19.0% females; Trutz Haase, 2008). This is almost double the current national unemployment rate (CSO, 2010). This is significant, as recent evidence indicates that, relative to those living in rural areas, males in urban areas are' more likely to remain welfare dependant after being unemployed for 12 months or more (O'Connell et al, 2009). Previous studies have identified a causal relationship between unemployment and ill health that appears to be particularly pronounced among men (Mathers and Schofield, 2008). Unemployment is associated with an increased risk of total mortality and affects both psychological and physiological risk factors for ill health (Wadsworth et aI, 1999).en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Larkin Unemployed Centre, Glasgow Celtic Football Club, Heath Service Executive, Pfizer Healthcare Irelanden_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Larkin Unemployed Centreen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.larkinctr.com/education/mens-health.phpen_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH STATUSen_GB
dc.titleMen's health and wellbeing programme: evaluation reporten_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.