Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324196
Title:
Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.
Authors:
Best, Kate E; Tennant, Peter W G; Addor, Marie-Claude; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Boyd, Patricia; Calzolari, Elisa; Dias, Carlos Matias; Doray, Berenice; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; McDonnell, Bob; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Salvador, Joaquin; Tucker, David; Wellesly, Diana; Rankin, Judith
Affiliation:
Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Baddiley-Clark Building, Richardson Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, England, UK.
Citation:
Best KE et al. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study. 2012, 97 (5):F353-8 Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed.
Journal:
Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324196
DOI:
10.1136/fetalneonatal-2011-300631
PubMed ID:
22933095
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22933095
Abstract:
The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.; Cases of SIA delivered during January 1990 to December 2006 notified to 20 EUROCAT registers formed the population-based case series. Prevalence over time was estimated using multilevel Poisson regression, and heterogeneity between registers was evaluated from the random component of the intercept.; In total 1133 SIA cases were reported among 5126, 164 registered births. Of 1044 singleton cases, 215 (20.6%) cases were associated with a chromosomal anomaly. Of 829 singleton SIA cases with normal karyotype, 221 (26.7%) were associated with other structural anomalies. Considering cases with normal karyotype, the total prevalence per 10 000 births was 1.6 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.7) for SIA, 0.9 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.0) for duodenal atresia and 0.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 0.8) for jejunoileal atresia (JIA). There was no significant trend in SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA prevalence over time (RR=1.0, 95% credible interval (CrI): 1.0 to 1.0 for each), but SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied by geographical location (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). There was weak evidence of an increased risk of SIA in mothers aged less than 20 years compared with mothers aged 20 to 29 years (RR=1.3, 95% CrI: 1.0 to 1.8).; This study found no evidence of a temporal trend in the prevalence of SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA, although SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied significantly between registers.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe. METHODS: Cases of SIA delivered during January 1990 to December 2006 notified to 20 EUROCAT registers formed the population-based case series. Prevalence over time was estimated using multilevel Poisson regression, and heterogeneity between registers was evaluated from the random component of the intercept. RESULTS: In total 1133 SIA cases were reported among 5126, 164 registered births. Of 1044 singleton cases, 215 (20.6%) cases were associated with a chromosomal anomaly. Of 829 singleton SIA cases with normal karyotype, 221 (26.7%) were associated with other structural anomalies. Considering cases with normal karyotype, the total prevalence per 10 000 births was 1.6 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.7) for SIA, 0.9 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.0) for duodenal atresia and 0.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 0.8) for jejunoileal atresia (JIA). There was no significant trend in SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA prevalence over time (RR=1.0, 95% credible interval (CrI): 1.0 to 1.0 for each), but SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied by geographical location (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). There was weak evidence of an increased risk of SIA in mothers aged less than 20 years compared with mothers aged 20 to 29 years (RR=1.3, 95% CrI: 1.0 to 1.8). CONCLUSION: This study found no evidence of a temporal trend in the prevalence of SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA, although SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied significantly between registers.
Keywords:
NEONATE
Local subject classification:
BIRTH DEFECTS; GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDER
MeSH:
Duodenal Obstruction; Europe; Female; Humans; Intestinal Atresia; Intestine, Small; Maternal Age; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Prevalence; Proportional Hazards Models; Registries
ISSN:
1468-2052

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBest, Kate Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorTennant, Peter W Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAddor, Marie-Claudeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBianchi, Fabrizioen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCalzolari, Elisaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDias, Carlos Matiasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoray, Bereniceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarne, Esteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGatt, Miriamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreenlees, Ruthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaeusler, Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhoshnood, Babaken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Boben_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullaney, Carmelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelen, Veraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRandrianaivo, Hanitraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRissmann, Ankeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalvador, Joaquinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorWellesly, Dianaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Judithen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-05T08:57:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-05T08:57:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-
dc.identifier.citationBest KE et al. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study. 2012, 97 (5):F353-8 Arch. Dis. Child. Fetal Neonatal Ed.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-2052-
dc.identifier.pmid22933095-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/fetalneonatal-2011-300631-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324196-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe. METHODS: Cases of SIA delivered during January 1990 to December 2006 notified to 20 EUROCAT registers formed the population-based case series. Prevalence over time was estimated using multilevel Poisson regression, and heterogeneity between registers was evaluated from the random component of the intercept. RESULTS: In total 1133 SIA cases were reported among 5126, 164 registered births. Of 1044 singleton cases, 215 (20.6%) cases were associated with a chromosomal anomaly. Of 829 singleton SIA cases with normal karyotype, 221 (26.7%) were associated with other structural anomalies. Considering cases with normal karyotype, the total prevalence per 10 000 births was 1.6 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.7) for SIA, 0.9 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.0) for duodenal atresia and 0.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 0.8) for jejunoileal atresia (JIA). There was no significant trend in SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA prevalence over time (RR=1.0, 95% credible interval (CrI): 1.0 to 1.0 for each), but SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied by geographical location (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). There was weak evidence of an increased risk of SIA in mothers aged less than 20 years compared with mothers aged 20 to 29 years (RR=1.3, 95% CrI: 1.0 to 1.8). CONCLUSION: This study found no evidence of a temporal trend in the prevalence of SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA, although SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied significantly between registers.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.-
dc.description.abstractCases of SIA delivered during January 1990 to December 2006 notified to 20 EUROCAT registers formed the population-based case series. Prevalence over time was estimated using multilevel Poisson regression, and heterogeneity between registers was evaluated from the random component of the intercept.-
dc.description.abstractIn total 1133 SIA cases were reported among 5126, 164 registered births. Of 1044 singleton cases, 215 (20.6%) cases were associated with a chromosomal anomaly. Of 829 singleton SIA cases with normal karyotype, 221 (26.7%) were associated with other structural anomalies. Considering cases with normal karyotype, the total prevalence per 10 000 births was 1.6 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.7) for SIA, 0.9 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.0) for duodenal atresia and 0.7 (95% CI 0.7 to 0.8) for jejunoileal atresia (JIA). There was no significant trend in SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA prevalence over time (RR=1.0, 95% credible interval (CrI): 1.0 to 1.0 for each), but SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied by geographical location (p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). There was weak evidence of an increased risk of SIA in mothers aged less than 20 years compared with mothers aged 20 to 29 years (RR=1.3, 95% CrI: 1.0 to 1.8).-
dc.description.abstractThis study found no evidence of a temporal trend in the prevalence of SIA, duodenal atresia or JIA, although SIA and duodenal atresia prevalence varied significantly between registers.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22933095en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal editionen_GB
dc.subjectNEONATEen_GB
dc.subject.meshDuodenal Obstruction-
dc.subject.meshEurope-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Atresia-
dc.subject.meshIntestine, Small-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Age-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Models-
dc.subject.meshRegistries-
dc.subject.otherBIRTH DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subject.otherGASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERen_GB
dc.titleEpidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Baddiley-Clark Building, Richardson Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AX, England, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalArchives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal editionen_GB

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