Economic exclusion, social exclusion and social integration in an enlarged European Union

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324075
Title:
Economic exclusion, social exclusion and social integration in an enlarged European Union
Authors:
Whelan,Christopher; Maitre, Bertrand; Economic and Social Research Institute
Citation:
Whelan C, Maitre B. Economic exclusion, social exclusion and social integration in an enlarged European Union. Dublin: Economic Social Research Institute; 2005. 43p.
Publisher:
Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324075
Additional Links:
http://www.esri.ie/
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In this paper we have sought to combine regional and social exclusion perspectives on economic exclusion in the enlarged EU. Our analysis confirms that while the economically excluded constitute substantially larger groups in the poorer regions they are much more sharply differentiated from others in the richer regions. These results bring out the importance of being able to combine both regional and social policy perspectives within the same conceptual and measurement framework. While the economically excluded are also disadvantaged in relation to more wide ranging measures of social exclusion no case can be made that variation in the level and intensity of economic exclusion help to account for regional differences in levels of social exclusion. Substantial variations across regions in levels of social cohesion are observed. However, the vast bulk of such variation occurs within rather than between regions. Furthermore, while the economically excluded generally report lower levels of social cohesion, the impact of such vulnerability is actually greater in the more affluent regions. Thus regional variations in levels of cohesion cannot be accounted for by the differential impact of economic exclusion. In fact, in the absence of this latter variation differences in such levels would actually be greater. Thus while the economically excluded are characterised by exposure to higher levels of social exclusion and lower levels of social cohesion, regional differences in these dimensions cannot simply be accounted for by corresponding differences in the levels or impact of economic exclusion.
Keywords:
SOCIAL EXCLUSION; SOCIAL INEQUAITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhelan,Christopheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaitre, Bertranden_GB
dc.contributor.authorEconomic and Social Research Instituteen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-01T12:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-01T12:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationWhelan C, Maitre B. Economic exclusion, social exclusion and social integration in an enlarged European Union. Dublin: Economic Social Research Institute; 2005. 43p.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324075-
dc.descriptionIn this paper we have sought to combine regional and social exclusion perspectives on economic exclusion in the enlarged EU. Our analysis confirms that while the economically excluded constitute substantially larger groups in the poorer regions they are much more sharply differentiated from others in the richer regions. These results bring out the importance of being able to combine both regional and social policy perspectives within the same conceptual and measurement framework. While the economically excluded are also disadvantaged in relation to more wide ranging measures of social exclusion no case can be made that variation in the level and intensity of economic exclusion help to account for regional differences in levels of social exclusion. Substantial variations across regions in levels of social cohesion are observed. However, the vast bulk of such variation occurs within rather than between regions. Furthermore, while the economically excluded generally report lower levels of social cohesion, the impact of such vulnerability is actually greater in the more affluent regions. Thus regional variations in levels of cohesion cannot be accounted for by the differential impact of economic exclusion. In fact, in the absence of this latter variation differences in such levels would actually be greater. Thus while the economically excluded are characterised by exposure to higher levels of social exclusion and lower levels of social cohesion, regional differences in these dimensions cannot simply be accounted for by corresponding differences in the levels or impact of economic exclusion.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEconomic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.esri.ie/en_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL INEQUAITYen_GB
dc.titleEconomic exclusion, social exclusion and social integration in an enlarged European Unionen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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