Long-term workforce participation patterns following head and neck cancer

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324047
Title:
Long-term workforce participation patterns following head and neck cancer
Authors:
Pearce, Alison; Timmons, Aileen; O’Sullivan, Eleanor; Gallagher, Pamela; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Thomas, Audrey Alforque; Molcho, Michal; Butow, Phyllis; Sharp, Linda
Citation:
Pearce A et al. Long-term workforce participation patterns following head and neck cancer. J Cancer Survivorship 2014 [published online 25 June 2014]
Publisher:
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Journal:
Journal of Cancer Survivorship
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/324047
DOI:
10.1007/s11764-014-0382-2
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11764-014-0382-2
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Abstract This analysis describes the long-term workforce participation patterns of individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods Survivors of HNC (ICD10 C00-C14, C32) diagnosed at least 8 months previously were identified from the National Cancer Registry Ireland and sent a survey including questions about working arrangements before and since diagnosis. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the factors that influence workforce participation at 0, 1 and 5 years after diagnosis. Results Two hundred sixty-four individuals employed at the time of diagnosis responded to the survey, an average 6 years post-diagnosis. Seventy-seven percent took time off work after diagnosis, with a mean work absence of 9 months (range 0–65 months). Fifty-two percent of participants reduced their working hours (mean reduction 15 h/week). The odds of workforce participation following HNC were increased by not being eligible for free medical care (OR 2.61, 95 % CI 1.15–5.94), having lip, mouth or salivary gland cancer (compared to cancer of the pharynx or cancer of the larynx, OR 2.79, 1.20–6.46), being self-employed (OR 2.01, 1.07–3.80), having private health insurance (OR 2.06, 1.11–3.85) and not receiving chemotherapy (OR 2.82, 1.31–6.06). After 5 years, only the effect of medical card remained (i.e., medical insurance) (OR 4.03, 1.69–9.62). Conclusions Workforce participation patterns after HNC are complex and are influenced by cancer, treatment and employment factors. Implications for Cancer Survivors Patients should be informed of the potential impacts of HNC on workforce participation, and clinicians, policy makers and employers should be aware of these potential longer-term effects and related variables.
Keywords:
CANCER; ABSENTEEISM
ISSN:
1932-2259; 1932-2267
Ethical Approval:
null; null

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Alisonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Aileenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Sullivan, Eleanoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Pamelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGooberman-Hill, Rachaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Audrey Alforqueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolcho, Michalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorButow, Phyllisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Lindaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-31T12:08:02Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-31T12:08:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-07-
dc.identifier.citationPearce A et al. Long-term workforce participation patterns following head and neck cancer. J Cancer Survivorship 2014 [published online 25 June 2014]en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-2259-
dc.identifier.issn1932-2267-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11764-014-0382-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/324047-
dc.descriptionAbstract This analysis describes the long-term workforce participation patterns of individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods Survivors of HNC (ICD10 C00-C14, C32) diagnosed at least 8 months previously were identified from the National Cancer Registry Ireland and sent a survey including questions about working arrangements before and since diagnosis. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the factors that influence workforce participation at 0, 1 and 5 years after diagnosis. Results Two hundred sixty-four individuals employed at the time of diagnosis responded to the survey, an average 6 years post-diagnosis. Seventy-seven percent took time off work after diagnosis, with a mean work absence of 9 months (range 0–65 months). Fifty-two percent of participants reduced their working hours (mean reduction 15 h/week). The odds of workforce participation following HNC were increased by not being eligible for free medical care (OR 2.61, 95 % CI 1.15–5.94), having lip, mouth or salivary gland cancer (compared to cancer of the pharynx or cancer of the larynx, OR 2.79, 1.20–6.46), being self-employed (OR 2.01, 1.07–3.80), having private health insurance (OR 2.06, 1.11–3.85) and not receiving chemotherapy (OR 2.82, 1.31–6.06). After 5 years, only the effect of medical card remained (i.e., medical insurance) (OR 4.03, 1.69–9.62). Conclusions Workforce participation patterns after HNC are complex and are influenced by cancer, treatment and employment factors. Implications for Cancer Survivors Patients should be informed of the potential impacts of HNC on workforce participation, and clinicians, policy makers and employers should be aware of these potential longer-term effects and related variables.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJournal of Cancer Survivorshipen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11764-014-0382-2en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Cancer Survivorshipen_GB
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subjectABSENTEEISMen_GB
dc.titleLong-term workforce participation patterns following head and neck canceren_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cancer Survivorshipen_GB
cr.approval.ethicalnull-
cr.approval.ethicalnull-
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