Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323885
Title:
Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment.
Authors:
Botto, Lorenzo D; Lisi, Alessandra; Bower, Carol; Canfield, Mark A; Dattani, Nirupa; De Vigan, Catherine; De Walle, Hermien; Erickson, David J; Halliday, Jane; Irgens, Lorentz M; Lowry, R Brian; McDonnell, Robert; Metneki, Julia; Poetzsch, Simone; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Siffel, Csaba; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Citation:
Botto LD et al. Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment. Birth Defects Res. Part A Clin. Mol. Teratol. 2006, 76 (10):693-705
Journal:
Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratology
Issue Date:
Oct-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323885
DOI:
10.1002/bdra.20307
PubMed ID:
17029289
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17029289
Abstract:
Two crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies can reduce the occurrence of other birth defects. Using data from 15 registries, we assessed rates and trends of 14 major defects, including NTDs, in areas with official recommendations or fortification to assess the effectiveness of recommendations and fortification on a wide range of major birth defects.; We evaluated surveillance data through 2003 on major birth defects from population-based registries from Europe, North America, and Australia. All included ascertainment of pregnancy terminations (where legal). Trends before and after policies or fortification were assessed via Poisson regression and were compared via rate ratios.; Significant changes in trends were seen for NTDs in areas with fortification but not in areas with supplementation recommendations alone. For other major birth defects, there was an overall lack of major trend changes after recommendations or fortification. However, some significant declines were observed for select birth defects in individual areas.; Recommendations alone remain an ineffective approach in translating the known protective effect of folic acid in population-wide decline in NTD rates. Fortification appears to be effective in reducing NTDs. The effect on other birth defects remains unclear.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Two crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies can reduce the occurrence of other birth defects. Using data from 15 registries, we assessed rates and trends of 14 major defects, including NTDs, in areas with official recommendations or fortification to assess the effectiveness of recommendations and fortification on a wide range of major birth defects. METHODS: We evaluated surveillance data through 2003 on major birth defects from population-based registries from Europe, North America, and Australia. All included ascertainment of pregnancy terminations (where legal). Trends before and after policies or fortification were assessed via Poisson regression and were compared via rate ratios. RESULTS: Significant changes in trends were seen for NTDs in areas with fortification but not in areas with supplementation recommendations alone. For other major birth defects, there was an overall lack of major trend changes after recommendations or fortification. However, some significant declines were observed for select birth defects in individual areas. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations alone remain an ineffective approach in translating the known protective effect of folic acid in population-wide decline in NTD rates. Fortification appears to be effective in reducing NTDs. The effect on other birth defects remains unclear.
Keywords:
FOLIC ACID
Local subject classification:
BIRTH DEFECTS; NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH; CONGENITAL ANOMALY; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
MeSH:
Dietary Supplements; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Female; Folic Acid; Food, Fortified; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; International Cooperation; Male; Neural Tube Defects; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications; Registries; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
1542-0752

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBotto, Lorenzo Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorLisi, Alessandraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBower, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCanfield, Mark Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDattani, Nirupaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDe Vigan, Catherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDe Walle, Hermienen_GB
dc.contributor.authorErickson, David Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHalliday, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrgens, Lorentz Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorLowry, R Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMetneki, Juliaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPoetzsch, Simoneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRitvanen, Annukkaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobert-Gnansia, Elisabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSiffel, Csabaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStoll, Claudeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMastroiacovo, Pierpaoloen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-29T08:53:29Zen
dc.date.available2014-07-29T08:53:29Zen
dc.date.issued2006-10en
dc.identifier.citationBotto LD et al. Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment. Birth Defects Res. Part A Clin. Mol. Teratol. 2006, 76 (10):693-705en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1542-0752en
dc.identifier.pmid17029289en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bdra.20307en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323885en
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Two crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies can reduce the occurrence of other birth defects. Using data from 15 registries, we assessed rates and trends of 14 major defects, including NTDs, in areas with official recommendations or fortification to assess the effectiveness of recommendations and fortification on a wide range of major birth defects. METHODS: We evaluated surveillance data through 2003 on major birth defects from population-based registries from Europe, North America, and Australia. All included ascertainment of pregnancy terminations (where legal). Trends before and after policies or fortification were assessed via Poisson regression and were compared via rate ratios. RESULTS: Significant changes in trends were seen for NTDs in areas with fortification but not in areas with supplementation recommendations alone. For other major birth defects, there was an overall lack of major trend changes after recommendations or fortification. However, some significant declines were observed for select birth defects in individual areas. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations alone remain an ineffective approach in translating the known protective effect of folic acid in population-wide decline in NTD rates. Fortification appears to be effective in reducing NTDs. The effect on other birth defects remains unclear.en_GB
dc.description.abstractTwo crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies can reduce the occurrence of other birth defects. Using data from 15 registries, we assessed rates and trends of 14 major defects, including NTDs, in areas with official recommendations or fortification to assess the effectiveness of recommendations and fortification on a wide range of major birth defects.en
dc.description.abstractWe evaluated surveillance data through 2003 on major birth defects from population-based registries from Europe, North America, and Australia. All included ascertainment of pregnancy terminations (where legal). Trends before and after policies or fortification were assessed via Poisson regression and were compared via rate ratios.en
dc.description.abstractSignificant changes in trends were seen for NTDs in areas with fortification but not in areas with supplementation recommendations alone. For other major birth defects, there was an overall lack of major trend changes after recommendations or fortification. However, some significant declines were observed for select birth defects in individual areas.en
dc.description.abstractRecommendations alone remain an ineffective approach in translating the known protective effect of folic acid in population-wide decline in NTD rates. Fortification appears to be effective in reducing NTDs. The effect on other birth defects remains unclear.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17029289en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratologyen_GB
dc.subjectFOLIC ACIDen_GB
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshEvaluation Studies as Topicen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFolic Aciden
dc.subject.meshFood, Fortifieden
dc.subject.meshGuidelines as Topicen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInternational Cooperationen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshNeural Tube Defectsen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.otherBIRTH DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subject.otherNEURAL TUBE DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subject.otherDEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTHen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALYen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.titleTrends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBirth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratologyen_GB

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