International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations: are the recommendations working?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323809
Title:
International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations: are the recommendations working?
Authors:
Botto LD, Lisi A, Robert-Gnansia E, Erickson JD, Vollset SE, Mastroiacovo P, Botting B, Cochi G, de Vigan C, de Walle H, Feijoo M, Irgens LM, McDonnell B, Merlob P, Ritvanen A, Scarano G, Siffel C, Metneki J, Stoll C, Smithells R, Goujard J
Journal:
Botto LD et al. International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations: are the recommendations working? Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2005;60(9):563-5.
Issue Date:
Mar-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323809
Additional Links:
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/16400506/international-retrospective-cohort-study-neural-tube-defects-relation-folic-acid-recommendations-are-recommendations-working
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of policies and recommendations on folic acid aimed at reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects. Design Retrospective cohort study of births monitored by birth defect registries. Setting 13 birth defects registries monitoring rates of neural tube defects from 1988 to 1998 in Norway, Finland, Northern Netherlands, England and Wales, Ireland, France (Paris, Strasbourg, and Central East), Hungary, Italy (Emilia Romagna and Campania), Portugal, and Israel. Cases of neural tube defects were ascertained among liveborn infants, stillbirths, and pregnancy terminations (where legal). Policies and recommendations were ascertained by interview and literature review. Main outcome measures Incidences and trends in rates of neural tube defects before and after 1992 (the year of the first recommendations) and before and after the year of local recommendations (when applicable). Results The issuing of recommendations on folic acid was followed by no detectable improvement in the trends of incidence of neural tube defects. Conclusions Recommendations alone did not seem to influence trends in neural tube defects up to six years after the confirmation of the effectiveness of folic acid in clinical trials. New cases of neural tube defects preventable by folic acid continue to accumulate. A reasonable strategy would be to quickly integrate food fortification with fuller implementation of recommendations on supplements.
Keywords:
FOLIC ACID
Local subject classification:
NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; CONGENITAL ANOMALY; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBotto LD, Lisi A, Robert-Gnansia E, Erickson JD, Vollset SE, Mastroiacovo P, Botting B, Cochi G, de Vigan C, de Walle H, Feijoo M, Irgens LM, McDonnell B, Merlob P, Ritvanen A, Scarano G, Siffel C, Metneki J, Stoll C, Smithells R, Goujard Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-25T10:33:45Zen
dc.date.available2014-07-25T10:33:45Zen
dc.date.issued2005-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323809en
dc.descriptionObjectives To evaluate the effectiveness of policies and recommendations on folic acid aimed at reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects. Design Retrospective cohort study of births monitored by birth defect registries. Setting 13 birth defects registries monitoring rates of neural tube defects from 1988 to 1998 in Norway, Finland, Northern Netherlands, England and Wales, Ireland, France (Paris, Strasbourg, and Central East), Hungary, Italy (Emilia Romagna and Campania), Portugal, and Israel. Cases of neural tube defects were ascertained among liveborn infants, stillbirths, and pregnancy terminations (where legal). Policies and recommendations were ascertained by interview and literature review. Main outcome measures Incidences and trends in rates of neural tube defects before and after 1992 (the year of the first recommendations) and before and after the year of local recommendations (when applicable). Results The issuing of recommendations on folic acid was followed by no detectable improvement in the trends of incidence of neural tube defects. Conclusions Recommendations alone did not seem to influence trends in neural tube defects up to six years after the confirmation of the effectiveness of folic acid in clinical trials. New cases of neural tube defects preventable by folic acid continue to accumulate. A reasonable strategy would be to quickly integrate food fortification with fuller implementation of recommendations on supplements.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/16400506/international-retrospective-cohort-study-neural-tube-defects-relation-folic-acid-recommendations-are-recommendations-workingen_GB
dc.subjectFOLIC ACIDen_GB
dc.subject.otherNEURAL TUBE DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALYen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.titleInternational retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations: are the recommendations working?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBotto LD et al. International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations: are the recommendations working? Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2005;60(9):563-5.en_GB
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.