Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323796
Title:
Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register.
Authors:
Fan, C W; McDonnell, R; Johnson, Z; O'Keeffe, S; Crowe, M J
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine for Elderly, St. Columcille's Hospital, Dublin.
Citation:
Fan CW et al. Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register. Ir J Med Sci. 2000;169 (1):30-3
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
Jan-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323796
PubMed ID:
10846854
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10846854
Abstract:
Most patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome.; To examine the demography, severity, level of investigation, length of stay, mortality and discharge location of prospectively identified consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin.; Three hundred and twenty nine consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin were registered using the European Stroke Database over 50 weeks. The mean age was 73.3 years, whilst 20.1% patients were under 65 years. Prior to admission, 90% of patients were community dwelling with 14.9% of patients being dependent in activities of daily living. 22.4% of patients had some depression in level of consciousness on admission. The overall mortality rate was 26.1% whilst 136 (41.3%) were discharged home, 50 (15.2%) went to institutional care and 45 (13.7%) went to non general hospitals secondary rehabilitation units. The mean length of stay was 31.3 days. The combined poor outcome measure (mortality plus percentage of patients discharged to institutional care), was lower in one hospital compared to the other two hospitals (29.3% versus 44.65%, p > or = 0.05) probably reflecting case mix. Stroke accounted for 4.2% of all bed days in the major general hospital in this area. The overall CT scan rate was 84.5%, with 18.2% of CT scans showing a haemorrhagic component and two patients (0.8%) having brain tumours. Carotid doppler examinations were carried out in 37% of patients.; The results demonstrate the high mortality and prolonged hospital stay for stroke patients in this area and emphasise the need for co-ordinated stroke care and regular audit to ensure most effective use of hospital resources.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Most patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome. AIMS: To examine the demography, severity, level of investigation, length of stay, mortality and discharge location of prospectively identified consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty nine consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin were registered using the European Stroke Database over 50 weeks. The mean age was 73.3 years, whilst 20.1% patients were under 65 years. Prior to admission, 90% of patients were community dwelling with 14.9% of patients being dependent in activities of daily living. 22.4% of patients had some depression in level of consciousness on admission. The overall mortality rate was 26.1% whilst 136 (41.3%) were discharged home, 50 (15.2%) went to institutional care and 45 (13.7%) went to non general hospitals secondary rehabilitation units. The mean length of stay was 31.3 days. The combined poor outcome measure (mortality plus percentage of patients discharged to institutional care), was lower in one hospital compared to the other two hospitals (29.3% versus 44.65%, p > or = 0.05) probably reflecting case mix. Stroke accounted for 4.2% of all bed days in the major general hospital in this area. The overall CT scan rate was 84.5%, with 18.2% of CT scans showing a haemorrhagic component and two patients (0.8%) having brain tumours. Carotid doppler examinations were carried out in 37% of patients. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the high mortality and prolonged hospital stay for stroke patients in this area and emphasise the need for co-ordinated stroke care and regular audit to ensure most effective use of hospital resources.
Keywords:
STROKE AND TIA; HOSPITAL
MeSH:
Aged; Female; Humans; Ireland; Length of Stay; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Registries; Stroke; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
0021-1265

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFan, C Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, M Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-25T10:44:36Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-25T10:44:36Z-
dc.date.issued2000-01-
dc.identifier.citationFan CW et al. Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register. Ir J Med Sci. 2000;169 (1):30-3en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265-
dc.identifier.pmid10846854-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323796-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Most patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome. AIMS: To examine the demography, severity, level of investigation, length of stay, mortality and discharge location of prospectively identified consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty nine consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin were registered using the European Stroke Database over 50 weeks. The mean age was 73.3 years, whilst 20.1% patients were under 65 years. Prior to admission, 90% of patients were community dwelling with 14.9% of patients being dependent in activities of daily living. 22.4% of patients had some depression in level of consciousness on admission. The overall mortality rate was 26.1% whilst 136 (41.3%) were discharged home, 50 (15.2%) went to institutional care and 45 (13.7%) went to non general hospitals secondary rehabilitation units. The mean length of stay was 31.3 days. The combined poor outcome measure (mortality plus percentage of patients discharged to institutional care), was lower in one hospital compared to the other two hospitals (29.3% versus 44.65%, p > or = 0.05) probably reflecting case mix. Stroke accounted for 4.2% of all bed days in the major general hospital in this area. The overall CT scan rate was 84.5%, with 18.2% of CT scans showing a haemorrhagic component and two patients (0.8%) having brain tumours. Carotid doppler examinations were carried out in 37% of patients. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the high mortality and prolonged hospital stay for stroke patients in this area and emphasise the need for co-ordinated stroke care and regular audit to ensure most effective use of hospital resources.en_GB
dc.description.abstractMost patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome.-
dc.description.abstractTo examine the demography, severity, level of investigation, length of stay, mortality and discharge location of prospectively identified consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin.-
dc.description.abstractThree hundred and twenty nine consecutive stroke admissions to three general hospitals in South East Dublin were registered using the European Stroke Database over 50 weeks. The mean age was 73.3 years, whilst 20.1% patients were under 65 years. Prior to admission, 90% of patients were community dwelling with 14.9% of patients being dependent in activities of daily living. 22.4% of patients had some depression in level of consciousness on admission. The overall mortality rate was 26.1% whilst 136 (41.3%) were discharged home, 50 (15.2%) went to institutional care and 45 (13.7%) went to non general hospitals secondary rehabilitation units. The mean length of stay was 31.3 days. The combined poor outcome measure (mortality plus percentage of patients discharged to institutional care), was lower in one hospital compared to the other two hospitals (29.3% versus 44.65%, p > or = 0.05) probably reflecting case mix. Stroke accounted for 4.2% of all bed days in the major general hospital in this area. The overall CT scan rate was 84.5%, with 18.2% of CT scans showing a haemorrhagic component and two patients (0.8%) having brain tumours. Carotid doppler examinations were carried out in 37% of patients.-
dc.description.abstractThe results demonstrate the high mortality and prolonged hospital stay for stroke patients in this area and emphasise the need for co-ordinated stroke care and regular audit to ensure most effective use of hospital resources.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10846854en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.subjectSTROKE AND TIAen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRegistries-
dc.subject.meshStroke-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleHospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine for Elderly, St. Columcille's Hospital, Dublin.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB

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