Maternal folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323789
Title:
Maternal folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects
Authors:
Sutton, Marie; Mills, James L.; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James F.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Conley, Mary; Mc Donnell, Robert; Scott, John M.; Kirke, Peadar N.
Citation:
Sutton M et al. Maternal folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects. Birth Defects Res Part A 2011, 91 (7):610
Journal:
Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323789
DOI:
10.1002/bdra.20817
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdra.20817
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Background Periconceptional use of folic acid prevents most neural tube defects (NTDs). Whether folic acid and/or multivitamins can prevent other congenital anomalies is not clear. This study tested whether maternal blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations excluding NTDs are lower when compared to non-affected pregnancies. Methods We measured pregnancy red cell folate (RCF), vitamin B12, and homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in blood samples taken at the first antenatal clinic in Dublin maternity hospitals in 1986–1990 when vitamin supplementation was rare. The cases were mothers who delivered a baby with a congenital malformation other than NTD identified by the Dublin EUROCAT Registry; controls were a systematic sample of mothers of offspring without congenital malformations from the same hospitals in the same time period. Results The median maternal levels of RCF and tHcy did not differ significantly between cases and controls for any of the congenital malformation groups examined (RCF: all malformations 275.9 ug/L v controls 271.2; p=0.77; tHcy: all malformations 7.5 umol/L v controls 7.6; p=0.57). In an unadjusted analysis vitamin B12 was significantly higher in case-mothers whose babies had cleft palate only (p=0.006), musculoskeletal malformations (p=0.034) and midline defects (p=0.039) but not after adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusions Our data suggest that low maternal folate and B12 levels or high tHcy levels in early pregnancy are not associated with all congenital malformations excluding NTDs. Fortification with folic acid or B12 may not have a beneficial effect in the prevention of these anomalies.
Keywords:
PREGNANCY; FOLIC ACID
Local subject classification:
NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; CONGENITAL ANOMALY; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
ISSN:
15420752

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMills, James L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Anne M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTroendle, James F.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrody, Lawrence C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConley, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMc Donnell, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott, John M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKirke, Peadar N.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-25T08:55:59Zen
dc.date.available2014-07-25T08:55:59Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-25en
dc.identifier.citationSutton M et al. Maternal folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects. Birth Defects Res Part A 2011, 91 (7):610en_GB
dc.identifier.issn15420752en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bdra.20817en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323789en
dc.descriptionBackground Periconceptional use of folic acid prevents most neural tube defects (NTDs). Whether folic acid and/or multivitamins can prevent other congenital anomalies is not clear. This study tested whether maternal blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations excluding NTDs are lower when compared to non-affected pregnancies. Methods We measured pregnancy red cell folate (RCF), vitamin B12, and homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in blood samples taken at the first antenatal clinic in Dublin maternity hospitals in 1986–1990 when vitamin supplementation was rare. The cases were mothers who delivered a baby with a congenital malformation other than NTD identified by the Dublin EUROCAT Registry; controls were a systematic sample of mothers of offspring without congenital malformations from the same hospitals in the same time period. Results The median maternal levels of RCF and tHcy did not differ significantly between cases and controls for any of the congenital malformation groups examined (RCF: all malformations 275.9 ug/L v controls 271.2; p=0.77; tHcy: all malformations 7.5 umol/L v controls 7.6; p=0.57). In an unadjusted analysis vitamin B12 was significantly higher in case-mothers whose babies had cleft palate only (p=0.006), musculoskeletal malformations (p=0.034) and midline defects (p=0.039) but not after adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusions Our data suggest that low maternal folate and B12 levels or high tHcy levels in early pregnancy are not associated with all congenital malformations excluding NTDs. Fortification with folic acid or B12 may not have a beneficial effect in the prevention of these anomalies.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdra.20817en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratologyen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subjectFOLIC ACIDen_GB
dc.subject.otherNEURAL TUBE DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALYen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.titleMaternal folate, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defectsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBirth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratologyen_GB
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.