Avoiding burnout in nursing through mindfulness

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323662
Title:
Avoiding burnout in nursing through mindfulness
Authors:
Ruth, Alan
Citation:
Ruth A. Avoiding burnout in nursing through mindfulness. Nurs Gen Prac. 2014 Jul; 12-14
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in General Practice
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323662
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Ireland’s healthcare environment is very demanding. Nurses in general practice, must cope successfully with numerous demands to make timely, accurate decisions that can affect human lives. The work is very challenging and demands stamina and full engagement. Caring for patients is often emotionally draining and can contribute to job burnout. Burnout in health professionals has been associated with decreased patient satisfaction and longer patient-reported recovery times. The term ‘burnout’ was coined in 1974 by Dr Herbert Freudenberger. He defined burnout as “the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one’s devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired results.” Burnout is brought about by unrelieved work stress, which results in: • Depleted energy reserves and emotional exhaustion • Lowered resistance to illness • Increased dissatisfaction and pessimism • Increased depersonalisation in interpersonal relationships • Increased absenteeism, inefficiency at work, and reduced personal accomplishment Emotional exhaustion refers to feelings of being emotionally overextended and depleted of one’s emotional resources. It is a feeling of being drained and without any source of replenishment. Depersonalisation refers to a negative, hardened or excessively detached response to other people. Reduced personal accomplishment refers to a decline
Keywords:
NURSING; STRESS
Local subject classification:
MINDFULNESS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRuth, Alanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T11:23:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-23T11:23:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-07-
dc.identifier.citationRuth A. Avoiding burnout in nursing through mindfulness. Nurs Gen Prac. 2014 Jul; 12-14en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323662-
dc.descriptionIreland’s healthcare environment is very demanding. Nurses in general practice, must cope successfully with numerous demands to make timely, accurate decisions that can affect human lives. The work is very challenging and demands stamina and full engagement. Caring for patients is often emotionally draining and can contribute to job burnout. Burnout in health professionals has been associated with decreased patient satisfaction and longer patient-reported recovery times. The term ‘burnout’ was coined in 1974 by Dr Herbert Freudenberger. He defined burnout as “the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one’s devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired results.” Burnout is brought about by unrelieved work stress, which results in: • Depleted energy reserves and emotional exhaustion • Lowered resistance to illness • Increased dissatisfaction and pessimism • Increased depersonalisation in interpersonal relationships • Increased absenteeism, inefficiency at work, and reduced personal accomplishment Emotional exhaustion refers to feelings of being emotionally overextended and depleted of one’s emotional resources. It is a feeling of being drained and without any source of replenishment. Depersonalisation refers to a negative, hardened or excessively detached response to other people. Reduced personal accomplishment refers to a declineen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectNURSINGen_GB
dc.subjectSTRESSen_GB
dc.subject.otherMINDFULNESSen_GB
dc.titleAvoiding burnout in nursing through mindfulnessen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in General Practiceen_GB
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