Epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the East of Ireland in the 25-year period 1984–2008

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323649
Title:
Epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the East of Ireland in the 25-year period 1984–2008
Authors:
McDonnell, Robert; Owens, Miriam; Delany, Caroline; Earley, Michael; McGillivary, Anne; Orr, David J.; Duggan, Laura
Citation:
Epidemiology of Orofacial Clefts in the East of Ireland in the 25-Year Period 1984–2008. Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2014;51(4):e63
Journal:
The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323649
DOI:
10.1597/11-299
Additional Links:
http://www.cpcjournal.org/doi/abs/10.1597/11-299
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Objective : To describe the epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the east of Ireland. Design and Setting : A descriptive epidemiologic study on 851 cases of orofacial cleft identified over a 25-year period from 1984 to 2008 from more than 500,000 births. Results : There were 438 (51.5%) cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 413 (48.5%) cases of cleft palate. The total birth prevalence was 16.0 per 10,000 births for all orofacial clefts, 8.2 for cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and 7.8 for cleft palate. Of all cases, 63.7% (542/851) occurred as isolated anomalies, 21.5% (183/851) were associated with multiple anomalies, and 14.8% (126/851) were associated with a syndrome or chromosomal anomaly. A significantly increasing trend over the 25-year period was observed for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with syndromes or chromosomal anomalies among mothers younger than 35 years but not in those older than 35 years. Conclusion : A slightly higher rate of orofacial clefts was observed in the east of Ireland than was observed in European and multinational studies during the study period, and there were higher rates of cleft palate. The rising trend in the proportion of mothers aged 35 years or older in Ireland is not contributing significantly to orofacial clefts associated with chromosomal syndromes
Keywords:
PUBLIC HEALTH
Local subject classification:
CLEFT PALATE; OROFACIAL CLEFT
ISSN:
1055-6656; 1545-1569

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Miriamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelany, Carolineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEarley, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGillivary, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOrr, David J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuggan, Lauraen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T11:16:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-23T11:16:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology of Orofacial Clefts in the East of Ireland in the 25-Year Period 1984–2008. Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2014;51(4):e63en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1055-6656-
dc.identifier.issn1545-1569-
dc.identifier.doi10.1597/11-299-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323649-
dc.descriptionObjective : To describe the epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the east of Ireland. Design and Setting : A descriptive epidemiologic study on 851 cases of orofacial cleft identified over a 25-year period from 1984 to 2008 from more than 500,000 births. Results : There were 438 (51.5%) cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 413 (48.5%) cases of cleft palate. The total birth prevalence was 16.0 per 10,000 births for all orofacial clefts, 8.2 for cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and 7.8 for cleft palate. Of all cases, 63.7% (542/851) occurred as isolated anomalies, 21.5% (183/851) were associated with multiple anomalies, and 14.8% (126/851) were associated with a syndrome or chromosomal anomaly. A significantly increasing trend over the 25-year period was observed for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with syndromes or chromosomal anomalies among mothers younger than 35 years but not in those older than 35 years. Conclusion : A slightly higher rate of orofacial clefts was observed in the east of Ireland than was observed in European and multinational studies during the study period, and there were higher rates of cleft palate. The rising trend in the proportion of mothers aged 35 years or older in Ireland is not contributing significantly to orofacial clefts associated with chromosomal syndromesen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cpcjournal.org/doi/abs/10.1597/11-299en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journalen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.subject.otherCLEFT PALATEen_GB
dc.subject.otherOROFACIAL CLEFTen_GB
dc.titleEpidemiology of orofacial clefts in the East of Ireland in the 25-year period 1984–2008en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journalen_GB
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