Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323625
Title:
Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe
Authors:
Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Calzolari, Elisa; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; McDonnell, Bob; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Mullaney, Carmel; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov
Citation:
Luteijn MJ et al. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe. Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology. 2014, 100 (4):260
Journal:
Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Issue Date:
22-Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323625
DOI:
10.1002/bdra.23231
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdra.23231
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation to etiologic factors. Methods: Data on births conceived in 2000 to 2008 were extracted from 20 European Surveillance for Congenital Anomalies population-based congenital anomaly registries in 14 European countries. We performed Poisson regression analysis encompassing sine and cosine terms to investigate seasonality of 65,764 nonchromosomal and 12,682 chromosomal congenital anomalies covering 3.3 million births. Analysis was performed by estimated month of conception. Analyses were performed for 86 congenital anomaly subgroups, including a combined subgroup of congenital anomalies previously associated with influenza. Results: We detected statistically significant seasonality in prevalence of anomalies previously associated with influenza, but the conception peak was in June (2.4% excess). We also detected seasonality in congenital cataract (April conceptions, 27%), hip dislocation and/or dysplasia (April, 12%), congenital hydronephrosis (July, 12%), urinary defects (July, 5%), and situs inversus (December, 36%), but not for nonchromosomal anomalies combined, chromosomal anomalies combined, or other anomalies analyzed. Conclusion: We have confirmed previously described seasonality for congenital cataract and hip dislocation and/or dysplasia, and found seasonality for congenital hydronephrosis and situs inversus which have not previously been studied. We did not find evidence of seasonality for several anomalies which had previously been found to be seasonal. Influenza does not appear to be an important factor in the seasonality of congenital anomalies.
Keywords:
NEONATE; GENETICS
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; CONGENITAL ANOMALY; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
ISSN:
15420752

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLuteijn, Johannes Michielen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDolk, Helenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAddor, Marie-Claudeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArriola, Larraitzen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarisic, Ingeborgen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBianchi, Fabrizioen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCalzolari, Elisaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarne, Esteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGatt, Miriamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaeusler, Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhoshnood, Babaken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Boben_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelen, Veraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullaney, Carmelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQueisser-Luft, Annetteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Judithen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorVerellen-Dumoulin, Christineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorde Walle, Hermienen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYevtushok, Lyuboven_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T14:37:25Zen
dc.date.available2014-07-22T14:37:25Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-22en
dc.identifier.citationLuteijn MJ et al. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe. Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology. 2014, 100 (4):260en_GB
dc.identifier.issn15420752en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bdra.23231en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323625en
dc.descriptionThis study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation to etiologic factors. Methods: Data on births conceived in 2000 to 2008 were extracted from 20 European Surveillance for Congenital Anomalies population-based congenital anomaly registries in 14 European countries. We performed Poisson regression analysis encompassing sine and cosine terms to investigate seasonality of 65,764 nonchromosomal and 12,682 chromosomal congenital anomalies covering 3.3 million births. Analysis was performed by estimated month of conception. Analyses were performed for 86 congenital anomaly subgroups, including a combined subgroup of congenital anomalies previously associated with influenza. Results: We detected statistically significant seasonality in prevalence of anomalies previously associated with influenza, but the conception peak was in June (2.4% excess). We also detected seasonality in congenital cataract (April conceptions, 27%), hip dislocation and/or dysplasia (April, 12%), congenital hydronephrosis (July, 12%), urinary defects (July, 5%), and situs inversus (December, 36%), but not for nonchromosomal anomalies combined, chromosomal anomalies combined, or other anomalies analyzed. Conclusion: We have confirmed previously described seasonality for congenital cataract and hip dislocation and/or dysplasia, and found seasonality for congenital hydronephrosis and situs inversus which have not previously been studied. We did not find evidence of seasonality for several anomalies which had previously been found to be seasonal. Influenza does not appear to be an important factor in the seasonality of congenital anomalies.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdra.23231en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratologyen_GB
dc.subjectNEONATEen_GB
dc.subjectGENETICSen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALYen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.titleSeasonality of congenital anomalies in Europeen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBirth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratologyen_GB
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