Irish patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323327
Title:
Irish patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesia
Authors:
Torlot, G; Howells, L; Comara, J; Sayers, R
Citation:
Torlot G et al. Irish patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesia. IMJ 2014 Jun 107(6)
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323327
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
We read with interest the article by Mannion and Smith 1 about patientsâ knowledge of the role of anaesthetists in Ireland. Recent studies across the world have also shown that patients still have a misunderstanding of anaesthetistsâ role and qualifications. However interestingly there are exceptions, with 99% of patients in Switzerland acknowledging that anaesthetists were medically qualified 2 , suggesting that patient education in other countries has the potential to be further improved. We recently conducted a survey on 120 adult preoperative patients in the Severn region, with a view to demonstrate a substantial improvement in the understanding that patients had of the role and responsibilities of anaesthetists. Our results reinforce the results found in Smith and Mannionâ s study that public ignorance still exists, with only 72 % of patients believing that anaesthetists were qualified doctors. This shows a very minute increase since the study by Swinhoe and Groves (1994), when 65% of participants thought they were qualified 3 , despite the widespread use of the internet and increase in the general public’s interest in medicine over this 19 year period. In agreement with Smith and Mannionâ s study, a quarter of patients said they were unsure of any areas that anaesthetists worked outside the operating theatre and only 43% knew they worked in intensive care. We asked the participants which individual they felt was most responsible for treatment in an intra-operative emergency. 54% of patients believed this was the role of the surgeon, with only 18% saying the anaesthetist was â the main person in chargeâ . Additionally we asked participants to estimate the duration of training needed to become a consultant anaesthetist. 64% of patients thought it took between five and seven years after completing A-levels. Surprisingly 9% thought it only took two years and only 12% guessed the correct estimate of 14 years.
Keywords:
PATIENT EDUCATION
Local subject classification:
ANAESTHESIA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTorlot, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHowells, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorComara, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSayers, Ren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-17T11:19:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-17T11:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationTorlot G et al. Irish patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesia. IMJ 2014 Jun 107(6)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323327-
dc.descriptionWe read with interest the article by Mannion and Smith 1 about patientsâ knowledge of the role of anaesthetists in Ireland. Recent studies across the world have also shown that patients still have a misunderstanding of anaesthetistsâ role and qualifications. However interestingly there are exceptions, with 99% of patients in Switzerland acknowledging that anaesthetists were medically qualified 2 , suggesting that patient education in other countries has the potential to be further improved. We recently conducted a survey on 120 adult preoperative patients in the Severn region, with a view to demonstrate a substantial improvement in the understanding that patients had of the role and responsibilities of anaesthetists. Our results reinforce the results found in Smith and Mannionâ s study that public ignorance still exists, with only 72 % of patients believing that anaesthetists were qualified doctors. This shows a very minute increase since the study by Swinhoe and Groves (1994), when 65% of participants thought they were qualified 3 , despite the widespread use of the internet and increase in the general public’s interest in medicine over this 19 year period. In agreement with Smith and Mannionâ s study, a quarter of patients said they were unsure of any areas that anaesthetists worked outside the operating theatre and only 43% knew they worked in intensive care. We asked the participants which individual they felt was most responsible for treatment in an intra-operative emergency. 54% of patients believed this was the role of the surgeon, with only 18% saying the anaesthetist was â the main person in chargeâ . Additionally we asked participants to estimate the duration of training needed to become a consultant anaesthetist. 64% of patients thought it took between five and seven years after completing A-levels. Surprisingly 9% thought it only took two years and only 12% guessed the correct estimate of 14 years.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectPATIENT EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherANAESTHESIAen_GB
dc.titleIrish patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesiaen_GB
dc.typeOtheren
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
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