Surveillance, diagnosis and management of clostridium difficile infection in Ireland: national clinical guideline No. 3

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323307
Title:
Surveillance, diagnosis and management of clostridium difficile infection in Ireland: national clinical guideline No. 3
Other Titles:
National clinical guideline No. 3
Affiliation:
CDI Clinical Guideline Development Group
Citation:
National Clinical Effectiveness Council. National clinical guidelines on the surveillance, diagnosis and management of C. difficile infection in Ireland. Dublin: HSE; 2014
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE), Department of Health
Issue Date:
12-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323307
Additional Links:
http://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/Gastroenteric/Clostridiumdifficile/Guidelines/File,13950,en.pdf
Item Type:
Guideline
Language:
en
Description:
Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhoea in industrialised countries. It is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that is widely distributed in soil and the intestinal tracts of animals and is part of the normal gastrointestinal flora in up to 3% of healthy adults, up to 20% of adults on antimicrobial therapy and up to 90% of healthy newborns and infants. The incidence of C. difficile colonisation increases with the duration of hospital stay in adult in-patients. Gastrointestinal tract colonisation occurs via the faecal-oral route following environmental exposure to C. difficile spores or from contact with an infected person. The spectrum of C. difficile infection (CDI) ranges from mild diarrhoea to potentially fatal colitis. Antimicrobials predispose to CDI by disturbing the normal colonic microbiota permitting growth of C. difficile.
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL; COMMUNICABLE DISEASE; HOSPITAL
Local subject classification:
CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE; PATIENT CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-17T11:41:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-17T11:41:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-12-
dc.identifier.citationNational Clinical Effectiveness Council. National clinical guidelines on the surveillance, diagnosis and management of C. difficile infection in Ireland. Dublin: HSE; 2014en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323307-
dc.descriptionClostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhoea in industrialised countries. It is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that is widely distributed in soil and the intestinal tracts of animals and is part of the normal gastrointestinal flora in up to 3% of healthy adults, up to 20% of adults on antimicrobial therapy and up to 90% of healthy newborns and infants. The incidence of C. difficile colonisation increases with the duration of hospital stay in adult in-patients. Gastrointestinal tract colonisation occurs via the faecal-oral route following environmental exposure to C. difficile spores or from contact with an infected person. The spectrum of C. difficile infection (CDI) ranges from mild diarrhoea to potentially fatal colitis. Antimicrobials predispose to CDI by disturbing the normal colonic microbiota permitting growth of C. difficile.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE), Department of Healthen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/Gastroenteric/Clostridiumdifficile/Guidelines/File,13950,en.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNICABLE DISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.subject.otherCLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILEen_GB
dc.subject.otherPATIENT CAREen_GB
dc.titleSurveillance, diagnosis and management of clostridium difficile infection in Ireland: national clinical guideline No. 3en_GB
dc.title.alternativeNational clinical guideline No. 3en_GB
dc.typeGuidelineen
dc.contributor.departmentCDI Clinical Guideline Development Groupen_GB
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