Vitamin D Status in Irish Children and Adolescents: Value of Fortification and Supplementation.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323305
Title:
Vitamin D Status in Irish Children and Adolescents: Value of Fortification and Supplementation.
Authors:
Carroll, Aoife; Onwuneme, Chike; McKenna, Malachi J; Mayne, Philip D; Molloy, Eleanor J; Murphy, Nuala P
Affiliation:
Children's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland aoifecar@gmail.com.
Citation:
Vitamin D Status in Irish Children and Adolescents: Value of Fortification and Supplementation. 2014: Clin Pediatr (Phila)
Publisher:
Clinical pediatrics
Journal:
Clinical pediatrics
Issue Date:
7-Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/323305
DOI:
10.1177/0009922814541999
PubMed ID:
25006113
Abstract:
Background. Vitamin D has important skeletal and extraskeletal roles but those living at northerly latitudes are at risk of suboptimal levels because of reduced sunlight exposure. Aim. To describe the vitamin D status of Irish children and identify factors predictive of vitamin D status. Methods. A prospective cross sectional study was undertaken over a 12 month period. Two hundred and fifty two healthy children attending for minor medical or surgical procedures were recruited. All had 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone and bone profiles measured. Results. The mean (standard deviation) for 25OHD was 51(25) nmol/L (20.4 (10) ng/mL). Forty-five percent had levels >50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). The following variables were significantly associated with 25OHD levels >50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL): sample drawn in April-September, use of vitamin D supplements, consumption of formula milk, and non-African ethnicity. Conclusion. More than half of the children in this study had 25OHD levels less than 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). Vitamin D status was significantly improved by augmented oral vitamin D intake.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
VITAMIN DEFICIENCY; CHILD HEALTH
ISSN:
1938-2707

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Aoifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOnwuneme, Chikeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Malachi Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMayne, Philip Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Eleanor Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Nuala Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-17T11:32:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-17T11:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2014-07-07-
dc.identifier.citationVitamin D Status in Irish Children and Adolescents: Value of Fortification and Supplementation. 2014: Clin Pediatr (Phila)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1938-2707-
dc.identifier.pmid25006113-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0009922814541999-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/323305-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Vitamin D has important skeletal and extraskeletal roles but those living at northerly latitudes are at risk of suboptimal levels because of reduced sunlight exposure. Aim. To describe the vitamin D status of Irish children and identify factors predictive of vitamin D status. Methods. A prospective cross sectional study was undertaken over a 12 month period. Two hundred and fifty two healthy children attending for minor medical or surgical procedures were recruited. All had 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone and bone profiles measured. Results. The mean (standard deviation) for 25OHD was 51(25) nmol/L (20.4 (10) ng/mL). Forty-five percent had levels >50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). The following variables were significantly associated with 25OHD levels >50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL): sample drawn in April-September, use of vitamin D supplements, consumption of formula milk, and non-African ethnicity. Conclusion. More than half of the children in this study had 25OHD levels less than 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). Vitamin D status was significantly improved by augmented oral vitamin D intake.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherClinical pediatricsen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical pediatricsen_GB
dc.subjectVITAMIN DEFICIENCYen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleVitamin D Status in Irish Children and Adolescents: Value of Fortification and Supplementation.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChildren's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland aoifecar@gmail.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical pediatricsen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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